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Archives of Microbiology

, Volume 131, Issue 4, pp 351–355 | Cite as

Production of an aromatic aldehyde oxidase by Streptomyces viridosporus

  • Don L. Crawford
  • John B. Sutherland
  • Anthony L. PomettoIII
  • Jody M. Miller
Original Papers

Abstract

Streptomyces viridosporus strain T7A, when grown in liquid media containing yeast extract and aromatic aldehydes, oxidized the aromatic aldehydes to the corresponding aromatic acids. Benzaldehyde, m-hydroxybenzaldehyde, p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, and protocatechualdehyde were catabolized further via the β-ketoadipate and gentisate pathways. Dehydrodivanillin, isophthalaldehyde, salicylaldehyde, syringaldehyde, terephthalaldehyde, vanillin, and veratraldehyde were oxidized only as far as the corresponding aromatic acids. Phthalaldehyde and aliphatic aldehydes were not oxidized. The aromatic aldehyde oxidase, which was produced by cultures grown in either the presence or absence of aromatic aldehydes, was partially purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and ion-exchange chromatography. It consumed molecular oxygen, oxidized aromatic aldehydes to aromatic acids, and produced hydrogen peroxide all in equimolar amounts.

Key words

Aldehyde oxidase Aromatic aldehydes Streptomyces viridosporus 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Don L. Crawford
    • 1
  • John B. Sutherland
    • 1
  • Anthony L. PomettoIII
    • 1
  • Jody M. Miller
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Bacteriology and Biochemistry, Idaho Agricultural Experiment StationUniversity of IdahoMoscowUSA

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