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Marine Biology

, Volume 90, Issue 4, pp 545–549 | Cite as

Vertical distributions of decapod crustacean larvae and pelagic post-larvae over Great Sole Bank (Celtic Sea) in June 1983

  • J. A. Lindley
Article

Abstract

Variations in the vertical distributions of pelagic stages of decapod crustaceans are described from five hauls taken over the Great Sole Bank in June 1983. Analyses of the results discriminated between the distributions mainly according to the time of day at which the hauls were taken, suggesting that diel variations were their most significant feature. Substantial ontogenetic variations were observed in the distributions of Processa canaliculata.

Keywords

Vertical Distribution Significant Feature Decapod Crustacean Diel Variation Ontogenetic Variation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. A. Lindley
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Marine Environmental ResearchNatural Environment Research CouncilPlymouthEngland

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