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Archives of Microbiology

, Volume 118, Issue 1, pp 35–43 | Cite as

Reisolation of the carbon monoxide utilizing hydrogen bacterium Pseudomonas carboxydovorans (Kistner) comb. nov.

  • Ortwin Meyer
  • Hans Günter Schlegel
Article

Abstract

From enrichment cultures four carbon monoxide utilizing bacteria were isolated; strain OM5 isolated from waste water was studied in detail. The cells are Gram-negative, slightly curved rods, motile by a single subpolarly inserted flagellum. The colonies are smooth, translucent and not slimy.

The cells are able to grow autotrophically in mineral medium under an atmosphere of 40% CO, 5% O2 and 55% N2 at a doubling time of 20h (30°C) or of 85% H2, 5% O2 and 10% CO2 at a doubling time of 7h. Heterotrophic growth occurrd on organic acids such as acetate (t d =8h), pyruvate (t d =8h), lactate, crotonate, malate, succinate (t d =8h), formate (t d =35h) and glyoxylate as substrates.

The enzyme system for carbon monoxide utilization is formed only during growth on CO; hydrogenase is present in cells grown on CO or on H2+CO2 as well as grown on pyruvate. The rate of oxygen reduction by intact CO-grown cells is 3.7-fold higher in the presence of hydrogen than in the presence of carbon monoxide. During growth the stoichiometry of gas uptake was 6.1 CO+2.8 O2+H2O → 〈CH2O〉+5.1 CO2. For the new isolate the name Pseudomonas carboxydovorans (Kistner) comb. nov. has been proposed.

Key words

Autotrophic growth Hydrogen Carbon monoxide Gram-negative hydrogen bacteria Pseudomonas carboxydovorans Facultative autotrophs CO oxidation 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ortwin Meyer
    • 1
  • Hans Günter Schlegel
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für Mikrobiologie der Universität GöttingenGöttingenFederal Republic of Germany

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