Veterinary Research Communications

, Volume 15, Issue 2, pp 127–133 | Cite as

The relationship between appetite and plasma non-esterified fatty acid levels in housed calves

  • M. T. Fox
  • D. Gerrelli
  • S. R. Pitt
  • D. E. Jacobs
Physiology

Abstract

Non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) levels in housed, 3-month-old calves were monitored in two experiments designed to establish (i) the effect of diet and time of sampling in relation to feeding on blood levels; and (ii) the relationship between appetite and plasma NEFA in animals on chopped hay. In the first experiment, a significant drop in NEFA levels was recorded after feeding. Furthermore, the NEFA levels of calves maintained on concentrate were significantly lower than those on hay throughout the post-feeding period. In the second study, a significant negative correlation was established between NEFA levels and intake of chopped hay in (i) ad-lib-fed calves infected with the abomasal nematode Ostertagia ostertagi; (ii) worm-free animals pair-fed with those in group (i); and (iii) ad-lib-fed worm-free calves. Regression analysis of raw and transformed data from all three groups combined also yielded significant correlations. It is suggested that the measurement of blood NEFA may be a useful indirect indicator of feed intake in conditioned housed calves offered hay diets.

Keywords

appetite calves non-esterified fatty acids plasma 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. ArmourJ., 1974. Parasitic gastroenteritis in cattle. Veterinary Record, 95, 391–395Google Scholar
  2. BinesJ.A., HartI.C. and MorantS.V., 1983. Endocrine control of energy metabolism in the cow: diurnal variations in the concentrations of hormones and metabolites in the blood plasma of beef and dairy cows. Hormone and Metabolic Research, 15, 330–334Google Scholar
  3. BrookesP.A., DewA.M., PikeP.V. and RobertsC.J., 1984. Application of an automated enzymatic technique for the determination of non-esterified fatty acids in bovine blood. Veterinary Record, 114, 421–423Google Scholar
  4. CoopR.L., SykesA.R. and AngusK.W., 1982. The effect of three levels of intake of Ostertagia circumcincta larvae on growth rate, food intake and body composition of growing lambs. Journal of Agricultural Science, Cambridge, 98, 247–255Google Scholar
  5. DiMarcoN.M., BeitzD.C. and WhitehurstG.B., 1981. Effect of fasting on free fatty acid, glycerol and cholesterol concentrations in blood plasma and lipoprotein lipase activity in adipose tissue of cattle. Journal of Animal Science, 52, 75–82.Google Scholar
  6. EconomidesS.J., MillerT.B., ToppsJ.H., GelmanA.L. and KeithD.G., 1973. A preliminary study of the milk production, bodyweight changes and some blood characteristics of underfed beef cows. British Veterinary Journal, 129, 63–72Google Scholar
  7. EntrocassoC.M., ParkinsJ.J., ArmourJ., BairdenK. and McWilliamP.N., 1986. Production, parasitological and carcase evaluation studies in steers exposed to trichostrongyle infection and treated with a morantel bolus and fenbendazole in two consecutive grazing seasons. Research in Veterinary Science, 40, 76–85Google Scholar
  8. FoxM.T., GerrelliD., PittS.R., JacobsD.E., GillM. and SimmondsA.D., 1989. Ostertagia ostertagi infection in the calf: effects of a trickle challenge on the hormonal control of digestive and metabolic function. Research in Veterinary Science, 47, 299–304Google Scholar
  9. Lindsay, D.B., 1978. The use of measurements of energy status in pregnant ewes. In: The use of metabolites in animal production, Proceedings of the British Society for Animal Production (British Society for Animal Production, Milton Keynes; Occasional Publication 1), 99–120Google Scholar
  10. Russell, A.J.F., 1978. The effect of feeding pattern and sampling procedure on blood parameters. In: The use of metabolites in animal production, Proceedings of the British Society for Animal Production (British Society for Animal Production, Milton Keynes; Occasional Publication 1), 31–40Google Scholar
  11. SykesA.R. and CoopR.L., 1977. Intake and utilization of food by growing sheep with abomasal damage caused by daily dosing with Ostertagia circumcincta larvae. Journal of Agricultural Science, Cambridge, 88, 671–677Google Scholar
  12. VernonR.G., 1980. Lipid metabolism in the adipose tissue of ruminant animals. Progress in Lipid Research, 19, 23–106Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers bv 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. T. Fox
    • 1
  • D. Gerrelli
    • 1
  • S. R. Pitt
    • 1
  • D. E. Jacobs
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Veterinary PathologyThe Royal Veterinary CollegeLondonUK

Personalised recommendations