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Psychopharmacologia

, Volume 14, Issue 1, pp 1–11 | Cite as

Dimensions of the LSD, methylphenidate and chlordiazepoxide experiences

  • Keith S. Ditman
  • Thelma Moss
  • Edward W. Forgy
  • Leonard M. Zunin
  • Robert D. Lynch
  • Wayne A. Funk
Original Investigations

Summary

Through the retrospective use of the 156 item DWM Card Sort, the experiences from a single intravenous dose of 200 mcg of LSD, 75 mg of methylphenidate (Ritalin) and 75 mg of chlordiazepoxide (Librium) were compared in a population of 99 chronic male alcoholics treated in an “LSD setting” in a double-blind study. Surprisingly, 96 of the 156 items proved significantly different among the 3 groups. LSD was unique in producing Sensory and Perceptual Distortions (including Hallucinations or Illusions), and Mystical, Religious or Paranormal Sensations. However, contrary to expectation, LSD did not uniquely produce the traditional “therapeutic” experience, but appeared to be surpassed in that area by methylphenidate. Both drugs also produced some anxiety, while chlordiazepoxide produced relaxation, and enhanced music appreciation.

Key-Words

Lysergic Acid Diethylamide or LSD Methylphenidate or Ritalin Chlordiazepoxide or Librium Psychopharmacology Alcoholism and Drug Therapy 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1969

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keith S. Ditman
    • 1
  • Thelma Moss
  • Edward W. Forgy
  • Leonard M. Zunin
  • Robert D. Lynch
  • Wayne A. Funk
  1. 1.Beverly HillsUSA

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