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Lactic acid bacteria of meat and meat products

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Abstract

When the growth of aerobic spoilage bacteria is inhibited, lactic acid bacteria may become the dominant component of the microbial flora of meats. This occurs with cured meats and with meats packaged in films of low gas permeability. The presence of a flora of psychrotrophic lactic acid bacteria on vacuum-packaged fresh chilled meats usually ensures that shelf-life is maximal. When these organisms spoil meats it is generally by causing souring, however other specific types of spoilage do occur. Some strains cause slime formation and greening of cured meats, and others may produce hydrogen sulphide during growth on vacuum-packaged beef. The safety and stability of fermented sausages depends upon fermentation caused by lactic acid bacteria. Overall the presence on meats of lactic acid bacteria is more desirable than that of the types of bacteria they have replaced.

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Egan, A.F. Lactic acid bacteria of meat and meat products. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 49, 327–336 (1983). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00399507

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Keywords

  • Hydrogen
  • Sulphide
  • Lactic Acid
  • Lactic Acid Bacterium
  • Meat Product