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Antonie van Leeuwenhoek

, Volume 47, Issue 1, pp 41–51 | Cite as

Rapid distinction between micrococci and staphylococci with furazolidone agars

  • K. E. von Rheinbaben
  • R. M. Hadlok
Medical Microbiology

Abstract

Furazolidone agar proved to be a suitable medium for separating strains of the genera Micrococcus and Staphylococcus. 720 isolates (including 24 type strains) of gram- and catalase-positive cocci were tested for growth on tryptone soya and peptone agar with the addition of 50 μg/ml furazolidone. The results were compared with the classification obtained by the standard-O/F-test and by the test system of Schleifer and Kloos.

For routine identification and separation of staphylococci from micrococci a peptone agar with 20 μg furazolidone/ml is recommended.

Keywords

Agar Type Strain Peptone Suitable Medium Furazolidone 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© H. Veenman & Zonen B.V. 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. E. von Rheinbaben
    • 1
  • R. M. Hadlok
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Veterinary Food ScienceJustus-Liebig-University GiessenGiessenFederal Republic of Germany

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