Marine Biology

, Volume 71, Issue 1, pp 41–49

Leaf epifauna of the seagrass Thalassia testudinum

  • J. B. Lewis
  • C. E. Hollingworth
Article

Abstract

The abundance, composition and trophic relationships of metazoan leaf epifauna of the marine angiosperm Thalassia testudinum König were studied in Barbados, West Indies. Approximately 90 species from 11 phyla consisted chiefly of nematodes, harpacticoid copepods, crustacean nauplii, ostracods, and turbellarians. Epiflora- and detritus-feeders dominated the epifauna. Increasing leaf epiphytism was accompanied by faunal changes, most notably increased nematode, harpacticoid and polychaete density. Faunal composition was very similar to that of the temperate seagrass analogue Zostera marina.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. B. Lewis
    • 1
    • 2
  • C. E. Hollingworth
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.The Institute of OceanographyMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada
  2. 2.the Redpath MuseumMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada
  3. 3.School of Animal BiologyUniversity College of North WalesBangorWales, UK

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