Environmental Monitoring and Assessment

, Volume 9, Issue 1, pp 47–55 | Cite as

A sampling method to determine insecticide residues on surfaces and its application to food-handling establishments

  • R. B. Leidy
  • C. G. Wright
  • H. E. DupreeJr.
Article

Abstract

Known amounts of acephate, chlorpyrifos, and diazinon were applied to Formica, unfinished plywood, stainless steel, and vinyl tile. Cotton-ball and dental wick materials were dipped in 2-propanol and “swiped” over the treated surface area two time. More acephate was found on the second swipe compared to the first from vinyl tile, similar amounts on both swipes from plywood, and less on the second swipe from formica and stainless steel. The ratio of chlorpyrifos on Swipe 1 compared to Swipe 2 found with cotton-ball on both formica and stainless steel surfaces was equivalent (6:1), but a considerable difference was seen when two dental wick swipes were used. Residues of diazinon removed from formica and stainless steel were equivalent, regardless of the swiping material used. Residues of chlorpyrifos were detected by taking swipes of surfaces in two restaurants and a supermarket up to 6 mo after a prescribed application by a commercial pest control firm. The data show that measurable amounts of chloropyrifos can be detected on surfaces not treated with the insecticide for at least 6 mo.

Keywords

Stainless Steel Vinyl Similar Amount Steel Surface Chlorpyrifos 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Jackson, M. D. and Wright, C. G.: 1975, ‘Diazinon and Chlorpyrifos Residues in Food after Insecticidal Treatment’, Bull. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 13, 593–595.Google Scholar
  2. Oudbier, A. J., Chief, Special Studies Unit, Dept. of Health, State of Michigan. (Letter to B. Johnson, Div. Environ. Health, Washtenaw County Health Dept., Ann Arbor, MI). May 21, 1982.Google Scholar
  3. Wright, C. G. and Leidy, R. B.: 1978, ‘Chlorpyrifos Residues in Air after Application to Crevices in Rooms’, Bull. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 19, 340–344.Google Scholar
  4. Wright, C. G. and Leidy, R. B.: 1980, ‘Insecticide Residues in the Air of Buildings and Pest Control Vehicles’, Bull. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 24, 582–589.Google Scholar
  5. Wright, C. G., Leidy, R. B., and Dupree, H. E. Jr.: 1982, ‘Diazinon and Chlorpyrifos in the Air of Moving and Stationary Pest Control Vehicles’, Bull. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 28, 119–121.Google Scholar
  6. Wright, C. G., Leidy, R. B., and Dupree, H. E. Jr.: 1984, ‘Chlorpyrifos and Diazinon Detection on Surfaces in Dormitory Rooms’, Bull. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 32, 259–264.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© D. Reidel Publishing Company 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. B. Leidy
    • 1
    • 2
  • C. G. Wright
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. E. DupreeJr.
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Pesticide Residue Research LaboratoryNorth Carolina State UniversityRaleighUSA
  2. 2.Department of EntomologyNorth Carolina State UniversityRaleighUSA

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