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Marine Biology

, Volume 64, Issue 3, pp 311–316 | Cite as

Toxicity of zinc, cadmium and copper to the shrimp Callianassa australiensis. III. Accumulation of metals

  • M. Ahsanullah
  • D. S. Negilski
  • M. C. Mobley
Article

Abstract

Callianassa australiensis (Dana) that survived 14 d acute lethality studies were analysed to determine the concentrations of zinc, cadmium and copper in the whole shrimp and in various parts of the body. Using regression analysis, the influence of each metal upon the uptake of the others was studied. Zinc and cadmium appeared to enhance the uptake of each other. In a mixture of zinc and copper, the uptake of zinc was enhanced and that of copper was inhibited. In a mixture of cadmium and copper, the uptake of copper was inhibited by the presence of cadmium, but cadmium uptake was unaffected in the presence of copper. In a mixture of all three metals, similar effects were observed except that zinc and copper, occurring together, appeared to have no effect upon cadmium uptake. Additional 14 d experiments with cadmium suggested that accumulation of this metal was a function of metal concentration in the water and of duration of exposure. The whole shrimp cadmium concentration also appeared to be a function of the size of the shrimp. The variation in concentration factors is described and the need for further research on the effects of combinations of metals on various organisms is emphasized.

Keywords

Copper Zinc Toxicity Cadmium Regression Analysis 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Ahsanullah
    • 1
  • D. S. Negilski
    • 1
  • M. C. Mobley
    • 1
  1. 1.Marine Science LaboratoriesMinistry for ConservationQueenscliffAustralia

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