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Small Business Economics

, Volume 2, Issue 3, pp 171–181 | Cite as

Firm size and the demand for energy in Dutch manufacturing, 1978–1986

  • Aad Kleijweg
  • René Huigen
  • George van Leeuwen
  • Kees Zeelenberg
Article

Abstract

As in most other industrialized countries the oil price shocks in the seventies led to major rearrangements in the production processes in Dutch manufacturing. The substitution of (expensive) energy consuming processes by less energy intensive ones is analyzed by means of a dynamic equation, relating the energy demand to the level of output, the price of energy and the prices of other inputs. Using a rather unique data set, consisting of panel data pertaining to several thousands of manufacturing firms, it is found that large firms can reduce energy costs more than small firms.

Keywords

Production Process Dynamic Equation Panel Data Energy Cost Energy Demand 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aad Kleijweg
    • 1
  • René Huigen
    • 2
  • George van Leeuwen
    • 3
  • Kees Zeelenberg
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Fundamental ResearchResearch Institute for Small and Medium-Sized BusinessZoetermeerThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Department of Statistical MethodsNetherlands Central Bureau of StatisticsVoorburgThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Department of Statistics of Manufacturing and ConstructionNetherlands Central Bureau of StatisticsVoorburgThe Netherlands

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