Advertisement

Planta

, Volume 138, Issue 3, pp 217–221 | Cite as

Peptide transport by germinating barley embryos: Evidence for a single common carrier for di- and oligopeptides

  • C. F. Higgins
  • J. W. Payne
Article

Abstract

Competition for uptake of a range of amino acids and peptides by germinating barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) embryos was studied. Peptides and amino acids show no competition and are apparently absorbed by independent transport systems. However, peptides of widely different structures do compete and it seems that only a single peptide transport system is present in barley embryos, capable of handling both di- and oligopeptides. The ability of physiological peptides to totally inhibit the uptake of glycylsarcosine indicates they share a common uptake system which previously has been shown to have the properties of an active transport process. The characteristics of the barley peptide transport system are compared with those found in other organisms.

Key words

Germination (embryo) Hordeum Peptides Protein Storage protein Scutellum 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Becker, J.M., Naider, F.: Peptide transport in yeast: uptake of radioactive trimethionine in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 178, 245–255 (1977)Google Scholar
  2. Higgins, C.F., Payne, J.W.: Peptide transport by germinating barley embryos. Planta 134, 205–206 (1977a)Google Scholar
  3. Higgins, C.F., Payne, J.W.: Characterization of active dipeptide transport by germinating barley embryos: effects of pH and metabolic inhibitors. Planta 136, 71–76 (1977b)Google Scholar
  4. Higgins, C.F., Payne, J.W.: Peptide transport by germinating barley embryos: uptake of physiological di- and tripeptides. Planta 138, 211–215 (1978)Google Scholar
  5. Matthews, D.M.: Absorption of peptides by mammalian intestine. In: Peptide transport in protein nutrition, pp. 61–146, Matthews, D.M., Payne, J.W., eds. Amsterdam-Oxford-New York: North-Holland/American Elsevier 1975Google Scholar
  6. Payne, J.W.: Transport of peptides in microorganisms In: Peptide transport in protein nutrition, pp. 283–364, Matthews, D.M., Payne, J.W., eds. Amsterdam-Oxford-New York: North-Holland/American Elsevier 1975Google Scholar
  7. Payne, J.W.: Oligopeptide transport in E. coli: specificity with respect to side chain and distinction from dipeptide transport. J. Biol. Chem. 243, 3395–3403 (1968)Google Scholar
  8. Payne, J.W.: Transport and hydrolysis of peptides by microorganisms. In: ‘Peptides transport and hydrolysis’ CIBA Foundation Symposium No. 50 pp. 305–333. Amsterdam: Associated Scientific Publishers 1977Google Scholar
  9. Sleisenger, M.H., Burston, D., Dalrymple, J.A., Wilkinson, S., Matthews, D.M.: Evidence for a single common carrier for uptake of a dipeptide and a tripeptide by hamster jejunum in vitro. Gastroenterology 71, 76–81 (1976)Google Scholar
  10. Wolfinbarger, L., Marzluf, G.A.: Specificity and regulation of peptide transport in Neurospora crassa. Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 171, 637–644 (1975)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. F. Higgins
    • 1
  • J. W. Payne
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Botany, Science LaboratoriesUniversity of DurhamDurhamU.K.

Personalised recommendations