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Neurosurgical Review

, Volume 18, Issue 4, pp 237–245 | Cite as

Dysautoregulation in patients with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage. A SPECT study

  • Noriyuki Kuwata
  • Kiyoshi Kuroda
  • Masayuki Funayama
  • Naoya Sato
  • Naohiko Kubo
  • Akira Ogawa
Original Articles

Abstract

In patients with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage, changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) following drug-induced blood pressure reduction were examined by SPECT. Methods: The subjects were 68 patients with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage. The site of cerebral hemorrhage was the thalamus in 28 patients, and the putamen in 40 patients. RCBF was measured by SPECT using the 133Xe inhalation method. To reduce blood pressure, trimethaphan camsilate (an autonomic ganglion blocker) and diltiazem hydrochloride (a calcium antagonist) were used. Results: 1. In the acute period, mean CBF declined as the mean arterial blood pressure declined by more than 20% in both the putaminal and the thalamic hemorrhage group (p<0.01). 2. During the chronic period, a greater reduction in blood pressure was needed to induce mean CBF reduction. 3. Neither of the two drugs significantly reduced the mean arterial blood pressure, but the group receiving trimethaphan demonstrated a 7. ∼ 7.5% decreased in CBF, group while the receiving diltiazem showed a 2.2 ∼ 2.4% decrease (p<0.05). Conclusions: In patients with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage, a 20% or more drug-induced decrease in blood pressure resulted in a decrease in mean CBF. During the acute period of intracerebral hemorrhage, blood pressure showed reduced by 20%. Clinically, diltiazem was more effective than trimethaphan.

Keywords

Autoregulation HIH hypotention SPECT 

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Copyright information

© Walter de Gruyter & Co 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Noriyuki Kuwata
    • 1
  • Kiyoshi Kuroda
    • 1
  • Masayuki Funayama
    • 1
  • Naoya Sato
    • 1
  • Naohiko Kubo
    • 1
  • Akira Ogawa
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Neurosurgery, School of MedicineIwate Medical UniversityMoriokaJapan

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