Biology and Fertility of Soils

, Volume 22, Issue 3, pp 196–201 | Cite as

Effects of the urease inhibitor N-(n-butyl)phosphorothioic triamide in low concentrations on ammonia volatilization and evolution of mineral nitrogen

  • L. Vittori Antisari
  • C. Marzadori
  • P. Gioacchini
  • S. Ricci
  • C. Gessa
Original Paper

Abstract

Laboratory incubation experiments were conducted to study the influence of increasing concentrations of N-(n-butyl)phosphorothioic triamide (NBPT) on NH3 volatilization and rate of urea hydrolysis and evolution of mineral N in Ozzano, Rimini and Carpi soils with different physicochemical characteristics. Low concentrations of NBPT reduced NH3 losses due to volatilization after urea fertilization and the effectiveness of the inhibitor was related to the soil characteristics (e.g. high concentrations of organic C and sand). After 15 days of incubation, no significant reductions of losses were found for any of the NBPT concentrations employed in Rimini soil. The application of NBPT led to a considerable reduction of the formation of nitrite. This process was completely annulled with the highest dose of NBPT (0.5% w/wurea) in the Carpi soil after 15 days. In Rimini soil, however, the use of NBPT was less effective in influencing nitrite formation. The use of NBPT favoured accumulation of nitrate proportional to the NBPT concentration employed while it had no influence on the NHinf4sup+fixation by 2:1 layer silicates. The data obtained support previous evidence that NBPT is effective in reducing the problems encountered in using urea as fertilizer. However, environmental conditions and soil physicochemical characteristics may have an important influence on the effectiveness of NBPT.

Key words

Urease inhibitors N-(n-butyl)thiophosphorothioic triamide Urea hydrolysis Ammonia volatilization Nitrite accumulation 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Vittori Antisari
    • 1
  • C. Marzadori
    • 1
  • P. Gioacchini
    • 1
  • S. Ricci
    • 1
  • C. Gessa
    • 1
  1. 1.Instituto di Chimica AgrariaUniversità di BolognaBolognaItaly

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