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Selenium status in females with occupational cervico-brachial complaints

  • Kerstina Ohlsson
  • Andrejs Schütz
  • Robyn Attewell
  • Staffan Skerfving
Article

Summary

A hypothesis that selenium deficiency predisposes the development of occupational cervicobrachial complaints was tested in 134 females working in an assembly factory, with constrained work postures and repetitive work tasks. Seventeen subjects, who reported intake of selenium tablets, had higher plasma selenium levels than the others (104 vs 89 μg/l, P = 0.01). Among those who did not take selenium tablets, 21% reported symptoms from the upper back during the last 7 d, 21% from the neck, 38% from the shoulders, 15% from the elbows, and 27% from the hands. Subjects with pain in their elbows had slightly, but significantly, lower plasma selenium levels than asymptomatics (84 vs 90 μg/l, P = 0.048). For the other anatomical regions, there were no statistically significant differences. Thus, there was no major association between selenium status and pain; conclusions regarding any minor association must await further studies.

Key words

Elbows Occupational disease Plasma Selenium Shoulders 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kerstina Ohlsson
    • 1
  • Andrejs Schütz
    • 1
  • Robyn Attewell
    • 1
  • Staffan Skerfving
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Occupational MedicineUniversity HospitalLundSweden

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