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100 years of DSM-III paranoia

How Stable a Diagnosis Over Time?
  • Karl Koehler
  • Christiane Hornstein
Article

Summary

Modified stricter criteria for DSM-III paranoia were fulfilled by 63 (37%) of 169 Heidelberg probands given a diagnosis of “Case Record Paranoia” (CRP) during a 100-year period (1878–1977). Clinical findings were chiefly interpreted in light of the controversial issues of age, illness duration and type of delusional content pertinent to the formulation of a present-day valid definition for this disorder. With respect to diagnostic consistency over time, 56% of DSM-III paranoia cases with at least one further Heidelberg admission proved to be non-stable, non-consistency being overwhelmingly due to a change in a DSM-III schizophrenic direction.

Key words

Paranoia Delusional disorder DSM-III Diagnostic consistency 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karl Koehler
    • 1
  • Christiane Hornstein
    • 2
  1. 1.Psychiatrische UniversitätsklinikBonn
  2. 2.Psychiatrische UniversitätsklinikHeidelbergGermany

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