Oecologia

, Volume 57, Issue 1–2, pp 196–199

A direct measure of pollinator effectiveness

  • E. Eugene SpearsJr.
Original Papers
  • 275 Downloads

Summary

A direct measure of pollinator effectiveness, relying on seed set, is proposed, where:
$$PE_i = \frac{{(P_i - {\text{Z}})}}{{({\text{U}} - {\text{Z}})}}$$

Pi=mean number of seeds set/flower by a plant population receiving a single visit from species i

Z=mean number of seeds set/flower by a population receiving no visitation.

U=mean number of seeds set/flower by a population receiving unrestrained visitation.

The utility and limitations of the proposed measure are discussed and exemplified with a population of Ipomoea trichocarpa (Convoculaceae)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Eugene SpearsJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ZoologyUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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