Oecologia

, Volume 73, Issue 4, pp 553–558 | Cite as

Natural and Chernobyl-caused radioactivity in mushrooms, mosses and soil-samples of defined biotops in SW Bavaria

  • E. F. Elstner
  • Rita Fink
  • W. Höll
  • E. Lengfelder
  • H. Ziegler
Original Papers

Summary

Different mushrooms, mosses and corresponding soil samples have been collected mainly from two sites in the alpine region of southwestern Bavaria. At the end of the growthseason, September 1986, gamma spectroscopic analysis showed that the moss-, mould, and needle-layer contained considerably more 134Cs and 137Cs activity per unit fresh weight than eight different species of mushroom. These two isotopes were carried into the biotop mainly as a consequence of the Chernobyl accident. 131J could not be found any more in the samples ca. 5–6 months after the catastrophe. The activity of the cesium isotopes decreased with increasing soil depth. In the mushrooms the activity was relatively high in Xerocomus badius and surprisingly low in Boletus edulis; samples of the latter and of Cantharellus cibarius collected in September 1985 (before the accident) and kept deep frozen contained almost identical amounts of 137Cs as those collected from August to October 1986. Mushrooms contained considerably more of the natural isotope 40K than the needlelayers and the soil samples in the neighbourhood. In all mushrooms except Xerocomus badius the activity of 40K was generally higher than the 137Cs activity. The results indicate that except Xerocomus badius the analyzed mushrooms do not actively take up Cs from the soil, in contrast to K.

Key words

137Cesium Cesium uptake Chernobyl accident 40Mushrooms 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. F. Elstner
    • 1
  • Rita Fink
    • 2
  • W. Höll
    • 1
  • E. Lengfelder
    • 2
  • H. Ziegler
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für Botanik und MikrobiologieTechnische Universität MünchenMünchen 2Federal Republic of Germany
  2. 2.Strahlenbiologisches Institut der Ludwig Maximilians-Universität MünchenMünchen 2Federal Republic of Germany

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