Advertisement

Oecologia

, Volume 66, Issue 3, pp 387–393 | Cite as

Ecology of SO2 resistance

V. effects of volcanic SO2 on native Hawaiian plants
  • William E. Winner
  • Harold A. Mooney
Original Papers

Summary

Plant species reflected SO2-stress gradients that existed with increased distance from Hawaiian volcano vents which emit SO2. These changes relate, in part at least, to species differences in stomatal responses to SO2. The sensitive leaves do not close their stomata when exposed to elevated atmospheric SO2 concentrations.

Keywords

Plant Species Species Difference Stomatal Response Hawaiian Volcano 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Ayazloo M, Bell JNB (1981) Studies on the tolerance to sulphur dioxide of grass populations in polluted areas. I. Identification of tolerant populations. New Phytol 88:203–222Google Scholar
  2. Ayazloo M, Bell JNB (1982) Studies on the tolerance to sulphur dioxide of grass populations in polluted areas. II. Morphological and physiological investigations. New Phytol 90:109–126Google Scholar
  3. Bell JNB, Mudd CH (1976) Sulphur dioxide resistance in plants: a case study of Colium perenne. In: Mansfield TA (ed) Effects of air pollutants on plants Pub Cambridge University Press, London, pp 87–103Google Scholar
  4. Horsman DC, Roberts TM, Bradshaw AD (1979) Studies on the effect of sulphur dioxide on perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L). II. Evolution of sulphur dioxide tolerance. J Exp Bot 30:495–501Google Scholar
  5. Horsman DC, Wellburn AR (1977) Effect of SO2 polluted air upon enzyme activity in plants originating from areas with different annual mean atmospheric SO2 concentrations. Environ Pollut 13:33–39Google Scholar
  6. Kimmerer TW, Kozlowski TT (1981) Stomatal conductance and sulfur uptake of five clones of Populus tremuloides exposed to sulfur dioxide. Plant Phys 67:990–995Google Scholar
  7. Mansfield TA, Majernik O (1970) Can stomata play a role in protecting plants against air pollutants. Environ Pollut 1:149–154Google Scholar
  8. Taylor GE Jr (1978) Genetic analysis of ecotypic differentiation within an annual plant species, Geranium carolinianum L in response to sulfur dioxide. Bot Gaz 139:362–368Google Scholar
  9. Taylor GE Jr, Murdy WH (1975) Population differentiation of annual plant species, Geranium carolinianum, in response to sulfur dioxide. Bot Gaz 136:212–215Google Scholar
  10. Taylor GE Jr, Tingey DT (1981) Physiology of ecotypic response to sulfur dioxide in Geranium carolinianum L. Oecologia (Berlin) 49:76–82Google Scholar
  11. Winner WE, Mooney HA (1980a) Responses of Hawaiian plants to volcanic sulfur dioxide: Stomatal behavior and foliar injury. Science 210:789–791Google Scholar
  12. Winner WE, Mooney HA (1980b) Ecology of SO2 resistance: I. Effects of fumigations on gas exchange of deciduous and evergreen shrubs. Oecologia (Berlin) 44:290–295Google Scholar
  13. Winner WE, Mooney HA (1980c) Ecology of SO2 resistance: II. Photosynthetic changes of shrubs in relation to SO2 absorption and stomatal behavior. Oecologia (Berlin) 44:296–302Google Scholar
  14. Winner WE, Mooney HA (1980d) Ecology of SO2 resistance: III. Metabolic changes of C3 and C4 Atriplex species due to SO2 fumigations. Oecologia (Berl) 46:49–54Google Scholar
  15. Winner, WE, Koch GW, Mooney HA (1982) Ecology of SO2 resistance: IV Predicting metabolic responses of fumigated shrubs and trees. Oecologia (Berlin) 52:16–21Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • William E. Winner
    • 1
  • Harold A. Mooney
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biological SciencesStanford UniversityStanfordUSA

Personalised recommendations