Advertisement

International Urogynecology Journal

, Volume 4, Issue 1, pp 3–8 | Cite as

Double-blind crossover comparison of flavoxate and oxybutynin in women affected by urinary urge syndrome

  • R. Milani
  • S. Scalambrino
  • R. Milia
  • I. Sambruni
  • D. Riva
  • L. Pulici
  • F. Avaldi
  • R. Vigano
Original Article

Abstract

This double-blind multiclinic crossover study was performed in order to compare the efficacy and tolerance of a 4-week treatment course with flavoxate, given orally at 1200 mg/day, with that of oxybutynin, 15 mg/day orally, in women with idiopathic motor or sensory urgency. Fifty patients were included in the study: 41 (20 affected by sensory urgency and 21 by motor urgency) completed both courses of treatment and were evaluated for efficacy utilizing clinical and urodynamic criteria. Diurnal and nocturnal frequency, diurnal incontinence, urgency, dysuria, and daily utilization of pads were comparably reduced by both treatments. A statistically significant improvement in all urodynamic parameters was present at the end of both treatment courses. The effect on the urodynamic parameters of the two treatments was comparable. According to the patients, flavoxate cured or greatly improved the syndrome in 81.6% of cases, while oxybutynin produced the same effects in 78.9%. The difference in efficacy between the two treatments was not statistically significant. Of the 41 patients who received both treatment courses, 11 (26.8%) experienced adverse reactions with flavoxate, and 37 (90.2%) with oxybutynin treatment. Moreover, 5 patients, not included in the efficacy evaluation, interrupted the treatment because of side effects while taking oxybutynin, whereas no patients stopped while taking flavoxate. The severity of the side effects recorded during oxybutynin treatment was significantly greater than during treatment with flavoxate. Flavoxate showed comparable efficacy to oxybutynin in relieving the urge syndrome, but was associated with fewer and milder side effects.

Keywords

Flavoxate Oxybutynin Urge syndrome 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Da Re P, Verlicchi L, Setnikar I. Some basic derivatives of 3- methylflavone-8-carboxylic acid. J Med Chem 1960; 2:263–269Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Cazzulani P, Panzarasa R, Luca C, Oliva D, Graziani G. Pharmacological studies on the mode of action of flavoxate. Arch Int Pharmacodyn Ther 1984; 268:301–312Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Cazzulani P, Panzarasa R, De Stefani C, Graziani G. Mechanism of flavoxate antispasmodic activity. Comparative in vitro studies. Arch Int Pharmacodyn Ther 1985; 274:189–200Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Ruffmann R, Sartani A. Flavoxate, a drug with smooth-muscle relaxing activity. Drugs Exp Clin Res 1987; 13:57–62Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Ruffmann R. A review of flavoxate hydrochloride in the treatment of urge incontinence. J Int Med Res 1988; 16:317–330Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Abbiati GA, Ceserani R, Nardi D, et al. Receptor-binding studies of REC 15/2053 and other bladder spasmolytics. Pharm Res 1988; 5:430–433Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Milani R, Scalambrino S, Carrera S, Pezzoli P, Ruffmann R. Flavoxate hydrochloride for urinary urgency after pelvic radiotherapy: comparison of 600 mg versus 1 200 mg daily dosages. J Int Med Res 1988; 16:71–74Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Milani R, Scalambrino S, Carrera S, Pezzoli P, Ruffmann R. Comparison of flavoxate hydrochloride in daily dosage of 600 versus 1 200 mg for the treatment of urgency and urge incontinence. J Int Med Res 1988; 16:244–248Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Pocock SJ. Crossover trial. In: Clinical trials: a practical approach. Chichester: Wiley and Sons, 1983: 110–123Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Williams ME, Pannil C. Urinary incontinence in the elderly. Ann Intern Med 1982; 97:895–907Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Millard RJ. Urinary incontinence: an analysis of incontinence in the general population. Drugs 1988; 35:477–494Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Andersson KE. Current concepts in the treatment of disorders of micturition. Drugs 1988; 35:477–494Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Moisey CU, Stephenson TB, Brendler CB. The urodynamic and subjective results of treatment of detrusor instability with oxybutynin chloride. Br J Urol 1980; 52:472–475Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Gajewski JB, Awad SA. Oxybutynin versus propantheline in patients with multiple sclerosis and detrusor hyperreflexia. J Urol 1986; 135:966–968Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The International Urogynecology Journal 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Milani
    • 1
  • S. Scalambrino
    • 1
  • R. Milia
    • 1
  • I. Sambruni
    • 2
  • D. Riva
    • 2
  • L. Pulici
    • 3
  • F. Avaldi
    • 3
  • R. Vigano
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, San Gerardo Hospital (Monza)University of MilanMonzaItaly
  2. 2.III Obstetrics and Gynecology and Department, San Raffaele HospitalUniversity of MilanItaly
  3. 3.Medical DepartmentRecordati SpAMilanItaly

Personalised recommendations