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Immunogenetics

, Volume 21, Issue 1, pp 11–23 | Cite as

Characterization of the HLA-A2.2 subtype: T cell evidence for further heterogeneity

  • Frances M. Gotch
  • Charles Kelly
  • Shirley A. Ellis
  • Lesley Wallace
  • Alan B. Rickinson
  • Jan van der Poel
  • Michael J. Crumpton
  • Andrew J. McMichael
Article

Abstract

Five blood donors were identified whose HLA-A2 is different from the common HLA-A2. Their A2 molecule (A2.2) had a more basic isoelectric point than normal A2 (A2.1). Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) restricted. by HLA-A2.1, specific for influenza A and Epstein-Barr viruses, failed to lyse virus-infected target cells with HLA-A2.2. Identical patterns were obtained with both viruses. CTL from four of the A2.2-positive donors recognized target cells prepared from others in the group that shared only the HLA-A2.2 antigen. The A2.2 antigen from one donor seemed to be different in that target cells were not recognized by CTL from donors with the normal A2.1 nor with basic A2.2. There seems, therefore, to be heterogeneity within the HLA-A2.2 subtype.

Keywords

Influenza Target Cell Blood Donor Isoelectric Point Identical Pattern 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frances M. Gotch
    • 1
  • Charles Kelly
    • 2
  • Shirley A. Ellis
    • 1
  • Lesley Wallace
    • 3
  • Alan B. Rickinson
    • 3
  • Jan van der Poel
    • 4
  • Michael J. Crumpton
    • 2
  • Andrew J. McMichael
    • 1
  1. 1.Nuffield Department of MedicineJohn Radcliffe HospitalOxfordUK
  2. 2.Imperial Cancer Research Fund LaboratoriesLincoln's Inn FieldsLondon WC1UK
  3. 3.Department of Cancer StudiesUniversity of BirminghamBirminghamUK
  4. 4.Department of ImmunohaematologyUniversity Medical CentreLeidenThe Netherlands

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