Archives of Dermatological Research

, Volume 285, Issue 4, pp 193–196 | Cite as

The herpes-specific immune response of individuals with herpes-associated erythema multiforme compared with that of individuals with recurrent herpes labialis

  • S. L. Brice
  • S. S. Stockert
  • J. D. Bunker
  • D. Bloomfield
  • J. C. Huff
  • D. A. Norris
  • W. L. Weston
Original Contributions

Abstract

Infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) is the most common precipitating factor in the development of erythema multiforme (EM). It is not known why only a few of the many individuals who experience recurrent HSV infection also develop herpes-associated EM (HAEM), although a difference in the HSV-specific immune response has been postulated. The purpose of this study was to compare the HSV-specific immune response of individuals with HSV infection alone with that of individuals with HAEM. There were 21 patients in each of the two groups. Four parameters of the HSV-specific immune response were examined: (1) anti-HSV IgG titers were measured by ELISA; (2) antibody neutralization was assessed using a plaque assay; and (3) antibody-dependent complement-mediated cytotoxicity, and (4) antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity were investigated using a previously described in vitro HSV-specific cytotoxicity assay. No statistically significant differences were detected between the two patient groups. Thus, a difference in these HSV-specific immune mechanisms does not explain the development of HAEM in some individuals with recurrent HSV infection.

Key words

Herpesvirus hominis Cytotoxicity tests Humoral immunity 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. L. Brice
    • 1
  • S. S. Stockert
    • 1
  • J. D. Bunker
    • 1
  • D. Bloomfield
    • 1
  • J. C. Huff
    • 1
  • D. A. Norris
    • 1
  • W. L. Weston
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of DermatologyUniversity of Colorado School of Medicine, University of Colorado Health Sciences CenterDenverUSA

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