Advertisement

Bioprocess Engineering

, Volume 7, Issue 3, pp 97–100 | Cite as

Production of saikosaponins by tissue culture of Bupleurum falcatum L.

  • M. Katakura
  • T. Kimura
  • I. Endo
Originals

Abstract

The studies for production of saikosaponins by tissue culture of Bupleurum falcatum L. were carried out to produce saikosaponins with several kinds of media and plant hormones. Among the media and plant hormones studied, Gamborg's B-5 [23] medium containing 0.5 ppm kinetin (k) and 1.0 ppm 3-indolebutyric acid (IBA) was the most effective medium and hormone for production of saikosaponins. The highest content of saikosaponin-d in the dried cells was 0.26%, which was similar to a concentration of Bupleuri Radix.

Keywords

Waste Water Tissue Culture Water Management Water Pollution Kinetin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Abbreviations

MS

medium used by Murashige and Skoog [22]

G

medium used by Gamborg (B 5) [23]

W

medium used by White [24]

NN

medium used by Nitsch and Nitsch [25]

k

Kinetin

BAP

6-Benzylaminopurine

2,4 D

2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid

NAA

α-Naphtylacetic acid

IBA

3-Indolebutyric acid

IAA

3-Indoleacetic acid

ssd

saikosaponin-d

PM

Production medium

dw

Dry weight

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Furuya, T., et al.: Isolation of saponins and sapogenins from callus tissue of Panax ginseng. Chem. Pharm. Bull. 21 (1973) 98Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Furuya, T., et al.: Saponin production in cell suspension cultures of Panax ginseng. Planta Medica 48 (1983) 83Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Tabata, M., et al.: Pigment formation in callus cultures of Lithospermum Erythrorhizon. Phytochemistry 13, (1974) 927Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Mizukami, H., et al.: Effect of nutritional factors on shikonin derivative formation in Lithospermum callus cultures. Phytochemistry 16 (1977) 1183Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Mizukami, H., et al.: Variation in pigment production in Lithospermum Erythrorhizon callus cultures. Phytochemistry 17 (1978) 95Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Fujita, Y., et al.: Production of Shikonin derivatives by cell suspension cultures of Lithospermum Erythrorhizon (I). Plant Cell Reports 1 (1981) 59Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Fujita, Y.: Production of useful pigment by plant cell cultures. The Heredity 1 (separate volume) (1988) 117Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Yamada, Y., et al.: Selection of cell lines with high productivity of Shikonin derivatives by protoplast culture of Lithospermum Erythrorhizon cells. Agric. Biol. Chem. 49 (1985) 1755Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Fujita, Y., et al.: Production of Shikonin derivatives by cell suspension cultures of Lithospermum Erythrorhizon (II). Plant Cell Reports 1 (1981) 61Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Maeda, Y., et al.: Callus formation from protoplasts of cultured Lithospermum Erythrorhizon cells. Plant Cell Reports 2 (1983) 179Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Fujita, Y., et al.: Production of Shikonin derivatives by cell suspension cultures of Lithospermum erythrorhizon (III). Plant Cell Reports 2 (1983) 192Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Kubota, T., Hinoh, H.: The constitution of saponins isolated from Bupleurum Falcatum L: Tetrahedron Letters 3 (1968) 303Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Shimaoka, A.; Seo, S.; Minato, H.: Saponins isolated from Bupleurum falcatum L., Components of Saikosaponin b. J. Chem. Soc. Perkin I (1975) 2043Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Abe, H.; Sakaguchi, M.; Konishi, H.; Tani, T.; Arichi, S.: The effects of Saikosaponins on biological membranes. Planta Medica 34 (1978) 160Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Takagi, K.; Sibata, M.: Pharmacological studies on Bupleurum falcatum L. (I). Yagugaku Zasshi 89 (1969) 712Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Kubota, T.; Hinoh, H.: The constitution of saponins isolated from Bupleurum falcatum L, Tetrahedron Letters 3 (1968) 303Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Yamamoto, M.; Kumagai, A.; Yamamura, Y.: Structure and acitons of Saikosaponins isolated from Bupleurum falcatum L. (I). Arzneimittelforschung 25 (1975) 1021Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Yamamoto, M.; Kumagai, A.; Yamamura, Y.: Structure and actions of Saikosaponins isolated from Bupleurum falcatum L. (II). Arzneimittelforschung 25, (1975) 1240Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Arichi, S.; Konishi, H.; Abe, H.: Studies on mechanism of action of Saikosaponin effects of saikosaponin to hepatic injury induced by D-galactosamine. Acta Hepat. Jap. 19 (1978) 430Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Uomori, A., et al.: Studies on constituents tissue cultures of Bupleurum falcatum L. Syôyakugaku Zasshi 28 (1974) 152Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Linsmaier, E. M.; Skoog, F.: Organic growth factor requirements of Tobacco tissue cultures. Physiol. Plant. 18 (1965) 100Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Murashige, T.; Skoog, F.: A revised medium for rapid growth and bioassays with Tobacco tissue cultures. Physiol. Plant. 15 (1962) 473Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Gamborg, O. L., et al.: Nutrient requirements of suspension cultures of Soybean root cells. Exp. Cell. Res. 50 (1968) 151Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    White, P. R.: The Cultivation of Animal and Plant Cells, 2nd ed. 1963Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Nitsch, J. P.; Nitsch, C.: Haploid plants from Pollen Grains. Science 163 (1969) 85Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    Harada, M.: 13. Bupleuri Radix (Bupleurum Root): Quantitative Analysis of Components in Crude Drugs (Shôyaku) used frequently, p. 161 1989Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Katakura
    • 1
  • T. Kimura
    • 1
  • I. Endo
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of TechnologyTsumura Co., Ltd.Ibaraki-kenJapan
  2. 2.Chemical Tecnology LaboratoryInstitute of Physical and Chemical ResearchSaitama-kenJapan

Personalised recommendations