Mammalian Genome

, Volume 5, Issue 8, pp 503–508 | Cite as

Mapping of the ACTH, MSH, and neural (MC3 and MC4) melanocortin receptors in the mouse and human

  • R. E. Magenis
  • L. Smith
  • J. H. Nadeau
  • K. R. Johnson
  • K. G. Mountjoy
  • R. D. Cone
Original Contributions

Abstract

The melanocortin peptides regulate a wide variety of physiological processes, including pigmentation and glucocorticoid production, and also have several activities in the central and peripheral nervous systems. The melanocortin receptor family includes the melanocytestimulating hormone receptor (MSH-R), adrenocorticotropic hormone receptor (ACTH-R), and two neural receptors, MC3-R and MC4-R. In the human these receptors map to 16q24 (MSH-R), 18p11.2 (ACTH-R), 20q13.2 (MC3-R), and 18q22 (MC4-R). The corresponding locations in the mouse are 8, 18, and 2; a variant for mapping MC4-R has not yet been identified. The data reported here also show that the neural MC3 receptor maps close to a disease locus for benign neonatal epilepsy in human and near the El-2 epilepsy susceptibility locus in the mouse.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. E. Magenis
    • 1
    • 2
  • L. Smith
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. H. Nadeau
    • 4
  • K. R. Johnson
    • 4
  • K. G. Mountjoy
    • 3
  • R. D. Cone
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Molecular and Medical GeneticsOregon Health Sciences UniversityPortlandUSA
  2. 2.Child Development and Rehabilitation CenterOregon Health Sciences UniversityPortlandUSA
  3. 3.Vollum Institute for Advanced Biomedical ResearchOregon Health Sciences UniversityPortlandUSA
  4. 4.The Jackson LaboratoryBar HarborUSA

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