Comparative Haematology International

, Volume 3, Issue 2, pp 71–80 | Cite as

Comparison of the 1H and 31P NMR Spectra of Erythrocytes and Plasma from some Australian Native Animals: Bandicoot, Echidna, Koala, Little Penguin, Tammar Wallaby, Tasmanian Devil, Tree Kangaroo and Wombat

  • C. Rae
  • K. J. E. Sweeney
  • A. K. Krockenberger
  • N. S. Agar
  • C. H. Gallagher
  • P. W. Kuchel
Original Article

Abstract

1H and 31P NMR spectra were acquired from the whole plasma and ultrafiltrates of erythrocytes (RBC) from eight Australian native animals. Various metabolites contained in the samples were identified from their NMR spectra and their concentrations were determined where possible. The key observations were as follows. (1) High lysine concentrations in the RBC from Tammar wallaby (∼8 mmol/(L RBC)) were confirmed. (2) A resonance at δ 3.17 in the 1H spin-echo NMR spectrum of koala RBC was reassigned to the N+-(CH3)3 of betaine and not to ergothioneine as previously claimed. (3) A high concentration (∼10 mmol/ (L RBC)) of taurine was observed in the RBC from ‘little’ penguin. (4) The lack of ATP in the RBC of echidna, reported previously on the basis of standard biochemical assays, was confirmed directly by NMR spectroscopy. (5) The highest ergothioneine concentrations in the RBC of the eight species of animal were in the wombat (1.76 mmol/(L RBC)).

Keywords

Bandicoot Betaine Echidna Erythrocytes 1H NMR Koala Little penguin 31P NMP Plasma Tammar wallaby Tasmanian devil Taurine Tree kangaroo Wombat 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Agar NS, Board PG. (1983) Red cell metabolism. In Agar NS, Board PG (eds) Red blood cells of domestic mammals. Elsevier, Amsterdam, pp 227–252Google Scholar
  2. Agar NS, Stephens T (1975) Reduced glutathione — a comparative study of erythrocytes from various species of marsupials in Australia. Comp Biochem Physiol 52A:605–606Google Scholar
  3. Agar NS, Godwin IR, Suzuki M, et al. (1986) Comparative red cell metabolism in three wallaby species, Macropus eugenii, Macropus parma and Thylogale thetis (Macropododidae: Marsupilia). Comp Biochem Physiol 85A:297–299Google Scholar
  4. Agar NS, Godwin IR, Wells C, Wallis IR (1989) Erythrocyte metabolism in potorid, macropodid and vombatid marsupials. In: Brewer GJ (ed.) Progress in clinical and biological research. The Red Cell. Ann Arbor Conference, A. R. Liss, New York, pp 3–21Google Scholar
  5. Agar NS, Rae CD, Chapman BE, Kuchel PW (1991) 1H NMR spectroscopic survey of plasma and erythrocytes from selected marsupials and domestic animals of Australia. Comp Biochem Physiol 99B:575–597Google Scholar
  6. Bell JD, Brown JCC, Nicholson JK, Sadler PJ (1987) Assignment of resonances for ‘acute-phase’ high resolution proton NMR spectra of human plasma. FEBS Lett 215:311–315Google Scholar
  7. Benga G, Chapman BE, Gallagher CH, Cooper D, Kuchel PW (1992) NMR studies on diffusional water permeability of red blood cells from macropodid marsupials (kangaroos and wallabies). Comp Biochem Physiol 104A, 799–803Google Scholar
  8. Bender E (1984) Red cell metabolism: a manual of biochemical methods, 3rd edn. Grune and Stratton, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  9. Bland DK, Holland RA (1977) Oxygen affinity and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate in blood of Australian marsupials of differing body size. Resp Physiol 31:279–290Google Scholar
  10. Brown FB, Campbell ID, Kuchel PW, Rubenstein DL (1977) Human erythrocyte metabolism studies by 1H spin-echo NMR. FEBS Lett 82:12–16Google Scholar
  11. Bunn HF, Seal US, Scott AF (1974) The role of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate in mediating haemoglobin function of mammalian red cells. Ann NY Acad Sci 241:498–512Google Scholar
  12. Cork SJ, Foley WJ (1991) Digestive and metabolic strategies of arboreal mammalian folivores in relation to chemical defences in temperate and tropical forests. In: Palo RT, Robbins CT (eds) Plant defences against mammalian herbivory. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FLGoogle Scholar
  13. Hume ID (1982) In: Digestive physiology and nutrition of marsupials. Cambridge University Press, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  14. Isaacks R, Nicols S, Sallis J, Zeidler R, Kim HD (1984) Erythrocyte phosphates and haemoglobin function in monotremes and some marsupials. Am J Physiol 246:R236–241Google Scholar
  15. Kay FR (1977) 2,3-Diphosphoglycerate blood oxygen dissociation and the biology of mammals. Comp Biochem Physiol 57A:309–316Google Scholar
  16. Kiett AS (1971) Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-linked analysis of 2,3-diphosphoglyceric acid: spectrophotometric and fluorometric procedures. J Lab Clin Med 77:470–475Google Scholar
  17. Kim H, Zeidler RB, Sallis JD, Nichol SC, Isaacks RE (1981) Adenosine triphosphate-deficient erythrocytes of the egg-laying mammal, echidna (Tachglossus aculeatus). Science 213:1517–1519Google Scholar
  18. Kuchel PW (1989) Biological applications of NMR. In: Field LD, Sternhell S (eds) Analytical NMR. Wiley, Chichester, pp 157–219Google Scholar
  19. Melville DB (1959) Ergothioneine (1980). Vitam Horm 17:155–204Google Scholar
  20. Nicholson JK, Buckingham MJ, Sadler PL (1983) High resolution 1H NMR studies of vertebrate blood and plasma. Biochem J 211:605–615Google Scholar
  21. Scott AF, Bunn HF, Brush AH (1977) The phylogenetic distribution of red cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and its interaction with mammalian haemoglobin. J Exp Zool 201:269–288.Google Scholar
  22. Selle H, Chapman BE, Kuchel PW (1992) Release of choline by phospholipase D and a related phosphoric diester hydrolase in human erythrocytes. 1H NMR spin-echo studies. Biochem J 284:61–65Google Scholar
  23. Shihabi ZK, Goodman HO, Holmes RP, Connor ML (1989) The taurine content of avian erythrocytes and its role in osmoregulation. Comp Biochem Physiol 92:545–549Google Scholar
  24. White A, Handler P, Smith EC, Hill RC, Lehmann IR (1978) Principles of biochemistry, 6th edn. McGraw-Hill, San FranciscoGoogle Scholar
  25. Whittern D, Grutzner JB (1983) Approaches to quantitative NMR analysis. Fourth national NMR conference, Lorne, Vic. AustraliaGoogle Scholar
  26. Wolowyk MW, Fincham DA, Young YD (1986) A simple and convenient cell model for the characterisation of volume sensitive taurine and GABA. Proc West Pharmacol Soc 29:51–53Google Scholar
  27. York MJ, Kuchel PW, Chapman BE (1984) A proton nuclear magnetic resonance study of 7-glutamyl-amino acid cyclotransferase in human erythrocytes. J Biol Chem 259:15085–15088Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Rae
    • 1
    • 4
  • K. J. E. Sweeney
    • 1
    • 4
  • A. K. Krockenberger
    • 2
    • 4
  • N. S. Agar
    • 3
    • 4
  • C. H. Gallagher
    • 1
    • 4
  • P. W. Kuchel
    • 1
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryUniversity of SydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Department of ZoologyUniversity of SydneyAustralia
  3. 3.Department of PhysiologyUniversity of New EnglandEngland
  4. 4.Taronga ZooMosmanAustralia

Personalised recommendations