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Effects of selective sleep deprivation on sleep-linked prolactin and growth hormone secretion

  • Ulrich Beck
  • Dieter Marquetand
  • E. del Pozo
  • Ioana Lancranjan
Article

Summary

  1. 1.

    The secretion of prolactin and growth-hormone (hGH) was investigated during sleep in 10 healthy volunteers (8 males and 2 females): The comparison of one baseline night, one night after daytime physical exercise, and one night with selective deprivation of sleep stages 3 and 4 and paradoxical sleep showed clear differences of prolactin and hGH secretion during sleep.

     
  2. 2.

    Prolactin secretion is entrained into the sleep cycle of Non-REM and REM periods. A maximum of plasma hormone elevations occurs during the first quarter of sleep cycles, i.e., during Non-REM periods and less frequent rises at the end of the cycles, mainly during REM periods.

     
  3. 3.

    In contrast to growth hormone, concentrations of prolactin remain high also during later cycles occurring toward morning.This shows that high prolactin, but not high concentrations of hGH, regularly occur during sleep cycles with small amounts of slow-wave sleep.

     
  4. 4.

    Maximal prolactin concentrations during sleep are affected neither by preceding daytime physical exercise nor by selective deprivation of slow sleep stages 3 and 4. This is further evidence that slow-wave sleep stages are not necessary for the development of high plasma prolactin concentrations. However, peak values of growth hormone in the first and second cycle are significantly diminished after selective deprivation of sleep stages 3 and 4.

     
  5. 5.

    In abnormally long sleep cycles with artificial delay of the first REM period, the cyclical rhythmicity of prolactin release seems disturbed. This is further evidence for the sleep-dependent rhythmicity in the secretion of this hormone.

     

Key words

Sleep Growth-Hormone and Prolactin Secretion Sleep Cycle Selective Deprivation of Sleep Man 

Zusammenfassung

  1. 1.

    Bei 8 männlichen und 2 weiblichen Versuchspersonen wurde die Ausschüttung von Prolaktin und Wachstumshormon (hGH) im Schlaf untersucht. Eine Basisnacht, eine Nacht nach körperlichem Streß und eine mit selektivem Tiefschlaf- und REM-Entzug wurden verglichen mit dem Ergebnis unterschiedlicher Prolaktin- und Wachstumshormonsekretion in den Schlafcyclen.

     
  2. 2.

    Die Prolaktinsekretion zeigt Zeitbeziehungen zu den Schlafcyclen mit häufigem Prolaktinanstieg im ersten Cyclusviertel. Dagegen sind während des letzten Cyclusviertels, d. h. vorwiegend im paradoxen Schlaf, Anstiege selten.

     
  3. 3.

    Die Prolaktinspiegel bleiben auch während späterer Schlafcyclen gegen Morgen hoch im Gegensatz zum Abfall des Wachstumshormons. Dies zeigt, daß hohe Prolaktinspiegel auch in Cyclen mit geringen oder fehlenden Tiefschlafanteilen vorkommen.

     
  4. 4.

    Weder körperlicher Streß noch Entzug von Tiefschlaf (DE Stadien 3 und 4) beeinflussen die Prolaktinmaximalwerte. Daher ist Tiefschlaf mit langsamen Wellen keine Vorbedingung für hohe Prolaktinspiegel. Dagegen sind die Wachstumshormongipfelwerte in den ersten beiden Schlafcyclen nach selektivem Tiefschlafentzug deutlich vermindert.

     
  5. 5.

    In abnorm langen Schlafcyclen mit künstlichem Aufschub der ersten REM-Phase erscheint auch die cyclische Rhythmik der Prolaktinsekretion gestört. Trotz Unabhängigkeit von Tiefschlafstadien besteht eine schlafabhängige Rhythmik der Prolaktinausschüttung.

     

Schlüsselwörter

Schlaf Wachstumshormon- und Prolaktinausschüttung Schlafcyclus Selektiver Schlafentzug Mensch 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ulrich Beck
    • 1
  • Dieter Marquetand
    • 1
  • E. del Pozo
    • 2
  • Ioana Lancranjan
    • 2
  1. 1.Neurologische Universitätsklinik mit Abteilung für NeurophysiologieFreiburg i. Br.Germany
  2. 2.Department of Experimental TherapeuticsSandoz Ltd.BaselSwitzerland

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