Current Genetics

, Volume 7, Issue 2, pp 85–92 | Cite as

Isolation and characterization of yeast DNA repair genes

I. Cloning of the RAD52 gene
  • David Schild
  • Boyana Konforti
  • Carl Perez
  • Warren Gish
  • Robert Mortimer
Article

Summary

The RAD52 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has previously been shown to be involved in both recombination and DNA repair. Here we report on the cloning of this gene. A plasmid containing a 5.9 kb yeast DNA fragment inserted into the BamH1 site of the YEp13 vector has been isolated and shown to complement the X-ray sensitive phenotype of the rad52-1 mutation. The rad52-1 cells containing the plasmid form larger colonies than similar cells having lost the plasmid. This plasmid has been shown not to complement either the U.V. sensitivity or the recombination defect of the E. coli recA mutation. From the insert various fragments have been subcloned into the YRp7 and YIp5 vectors. Integration events of two of the subclones have been genetically mapped to the chromosomal location of RAD52, indicating that the structural gene has been cloned. A 1.97 kb BamH1 fragment subcloned into YRp7 in one orientation complements the rad52-1 mutation, while the same fragment in the opposite orientation fails to complement. Various other subclones indicate that a BglII site, within the BamH1 fragment, is in the RAD52 gene. This BglII site has been deleted by Sl-nuclease digestion and the resulting deletion inactivates the RAD52 gene. BAL31 deletions from one end of a 1.9 kb Sal1-BamH1 fragment have been isolated; up to 0.9 kb can be deleted without loss of RAD52 activity, indicating that the RAD52 gene is approximately 1 kb or less in length.

Key words

Yeast RAD52 Cloning S1 and BAL31 Deletions 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Schild
    • 1
  • Boyana Konforti
    • 1
  • Carl Perez
    • 1
  • Warren Gish
    • 2
  • Robert Mortimer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biophysics and Medical Physics and Donner LaboratoryUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA
  2. 2.Department of Molecular BiologyUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA

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