Composting of goat dung with various additives for improved fertilizer capacity

  • P. Agamuthu
Research Paper

Abstract

Composting of goat dung mixed with lime, soil, Napier grass or urea was followed by monitoring the C:N (w/w) ratio of the substrate, temperature, pH, moisture content, water-holding capacity, weight loss and mineral content. Equilibration to 24°C took between 90 and 120 days, the dung with Napier grass or urea composting fastest. Napier grass addition was also beneficial in decreasing loss of C and PO inf4 sup-3 and increasing N content. The most active region of the compost was 10 to 30 cm from the base of the heap. Depletion of C, PO inf4 sup-3 and K+ occurred during all compostings but varied among the treatments. The moisture content in the substrate remained between 34% and 73% (w/w) for all treatments, while the water-holding capacity averaged 100% to 150%. The average weight loss of substrate was between 55 to 84%. The compost could be used as manure for Napier grass production, although effluent from a palm oil mill was found to be superior.

Key words

Composting fertilizer goat manure Napier grass 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Agamuthu, P., Sivaraj, S. & Mukherjee, T.K. 1992 Agronomic and nutrition studies using Napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum) as fodder for goat and sheep grown with palm oil mill effluent (POME) as fertilizer. In Recent Advances in Goat production, 5th International Conference on Goats, March 1992, New Dehli, India, eds. Lokeshwar, R.R. & Kumar, A.T. pp. 685–693.Google Scholar
  2. Anon 1988 Investors Guide Series No. 8 — Mutton Industry in Peninsula Malaysia. Kuala Lumpur: Department of Veterinary Services, Ministry of Agriculture.Google Scholar
  3. Biddlestone, A.J. & Gray, K.R. 1985 Composting. In Waste Management and Production Control. Comprehensive Biotechnology, Vol. 4, ed. Young, M.M. pp 1059–1070. New York: Pergamon Press.Google Scholar
  4. Choo, P.Y., Yogendran, N. & Choong-Ng, K.H. 1991 Composting of cattle, sheep and goat manure. In Management and Utilization of Agricultural and Industrial Wastes: Proceeding of the Regional Seminar on Management and Utilization of Agriculture and Industrial Waste, 21 to 23 March 1990, University of Malaya, eds. Goh, S.H., Chuah, C.H., Tong, S.L., Phang, S.M. & Vikineswary, S. pp. 222–226.Google Scholar
  5. Taiganides, E.P. 1977 Composting of feedlot wastes. In Animal Science, ed. Taiganides, E.P. pp. 241–251. London: Applied Science.Google Scholar
  6. Vimala, P., Lee, C.S., Othman, A.B., Yogendran, N. & Choo, P.Y. 1991 Evaluation of animal manures on the yield of vegetable. In Management and Utilization of Agricultural and Industrial Wastes: Proceedings of the Regional Seminar on Management and Utilization of Agricultural and Industrial Wastes, 21 to 23 March 1990, University of Malaya, eds. Goh, S.H., Chuah, C.H., Tong, S.L., Phang, S.M. & Vikineswary S. pp. 227–232.Google Scholar
  7. Wilson, G.B. 1971 Composting dairy cow wastes. In Livestock Waste Management and Pollution Abatement, pp. 163–165. St Joseph, MI: American Society of Agricultural Engineers.Google Scholar
  8. Wilson, G.B. & Hummel, J.W. 1975 Conservation of nitrogen in dairy manure during composting. In Managing Livestock Waste, pp. 490–491. St. Joseph, MI: American Society of Agricultural Engineers.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Rapid Communications of Oxford Ltd 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Agamuthu

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations