Advertisement

Journal of Materials Science

, Volume 28, Issue 12, pp 3132–3136 | Cite as

Carbothermal synthesis of aluminium nitride at elevated nitrogen pressures

Part II Effect of process parameters on particle size and morphology
  • B. Forslund
  • J. Zheng
Papers

Abstract

The particle size and morphology of AlN product powders from carbothermal synthesis have been studied by scanning electron microscopy, surface-area measurement and microarea elemental analysis. AlN powders with widely variable grain size and morphology could be produced by varying the pressure, gas-flow rate and alumina type. Discrete AlN particles (∼ 0.5-3 μm) were obtained by using fine γ-Al2O3 as starting material at 1600 °C over the pressure and gas-flow rate ranges 0.1–5 MPa and 1–10 l min−1. When coarse α-Al2O3 was used as raw material, large aggregates of AIN particles normally formed, unless the reaction was run at high nitrogen pressure (5 MPa) and low gas-flow rate (1 l min−1). Occasionally, whiskers formed at relatively low temperatures and pressures, e. g. 1500 °C and <0.5 MPa. It was possible to obtain a discrete and fine AlN powder (∼ 0.5 μm) without seeding. The results suggest that reactions including aluminium-containing gas species play an important role in the control of morphology in carbothermal synthesis of AlN.

Keywords

Nitrogen Pressure Product Powder Aluminium Nitride High Nitrogen Pressure Alumina Type 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 2.
    B. Forslund and J. Zheng, J. Mater. Sci. 28 (1993) 3125.Google Scholar
  2. 3.
    I. Kimura, N. Hotta, H. Nukui, N. Saito and S. Yasukawa, J. Mater. Sci. 24 (1989) 4076.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Forslund
    • 1
  • J. Zheng
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Arrhenius LaboratoryStockholm UniversityStockholmSweden

Personalised recommendations