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Marine Biology

, Volume 112, Issue 1, pp 91–98 | Cite as

Sexual and asexual reproduction of Anthopleura dixoniana (Anthozoa: Actiniaria): periodicity and regulation

  • J. Lin
  • C. -P. Chen
  • I. -M. Chen
Article

Abstract

Reproduction of the sea anemone Anthopleura dixoniana (Haddon and Shackleton) from the high intertidal zone of southern Taiwan (120°41 ′E; 22°01′N) was studied from April 1987 through March 1989. A. dixoniana spawns once a year, in July, and divides asexually by longitudinal fission throughout the year, with a peak in July. During the spawning season, sea anemones>3 mm pedal dise diameter can be sexed, and display a 1:1 sex ratio. Dividing sea anemones are significantly larger than non-dividing individuals, and increase in body size before fission. Under laboratory conditions, individuals kept at 28 C and fed had larger oocytes and a higher division rate than those kept at 18, 22, 25 or 32°C or starved. The division rate significantly influenced the oocyte diameter. The present study revealed for the first time, that a long photoperiod (14 h hight:10 h dark) significantly enhances the growth of oocytes in A. dixoniana under laboratory conditions.

Keywords

Body Size Laboratory Condition Intertidal Zone Asexual Reproduction Division Rate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Lin
    • 1
  • C. -P. Chen
    • 2
  • I. -M. Chen
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of Marine BiologyNational Sun Yat-sen UniversityKaohsiungTaiwan, Republic of China
  2. 2.Institute of ZoologyAcademia SinicaTaipeiTaiwan, Republic of China
  3. 3.Department of Marine ResourceNational Sun Yat-sen UniversityKaohsiungTaiwan, Republic of China

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