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Marine Biology

, Volume 114, Issue 2, pp 175–183 | Cite as

Depth and temperature of the blue marlin, Makaira nigricans, observed by acoustic telemetry

  • B. A. Block
  • D. T. Booth
  • F. G. Carey
Article

Abstract

Multiplex acoustic transmitters were used to monitor the depth, swimming speeds, body temperature and water temperature preference of six blue marlin, Makaira nigricans (Lacépède), near the Hawaiian islands in July and August 1989. The blue marlin ranged in size from 60 to 220 kg and were tracked for 1 to 5 d. All of the fish moved away from the point of capture and were followed up to 253 km from the island of Hawaii. The blue marlin tracked remained in the top 200 m of the water column, spending half the time in the upper 10 m, and rarely ventured below the thermocline. In the nearsurface waters the temperature was uniformly warm (25 to 27°C). The coldest water temperature, 17°C, was encountered on the deepest descent recorded (209 m). Depth changes occurred rapidly and excursions below 10 m were usually less than 60 min in duration. Muscle temperature was similar to water temperature except for a 2°C elevation in muscle temperature observed at the beginning of tracking one individual. This initial rise in body temperature was associated with the anaerobic muscle activity during capture and is an indication of the physiological stress involved in capture.

Keywords

Water Temperature Water Column Body Temperature Muscle Activity Physiological Stress 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. A. Block
    • 1
  • D. T. Booth
    • 1
  • F. G. Carey
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Organismal Biology and AnatomyThe University of ChicagoChicaogUSA
  2. 2.Department of BiologyWoods Hole Oceanographic InstitutionWoods HoleUSA

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