Advertisement

Oecologia

, Volume 51, Issue 1, pp 37–41 | Cite as

Experimental analysis of movements by prairie rattlesnakes, Crotalus viridis, during hibernation

  • Owen J. Sexton
  • Ken R. Marion
Article

Summary

Prairie rattlesnakes from Colorado, USA, were subjected to two thermal treatments during hibernation. The control treatment was carried out in a surrogate den in St. Louis, MO, USA and followed the normal seasonal thermal regime. Experimental manipulations were carried out in a second den in St. Louis. These series of manipulations reversed or modified the thermal gradient normally expected in wild dens. Periodic observations of the snakes within the control and experimental dens provided corroborative data to support the hypothesis that entry to and exit from dens is regulated by a reversing thermal gradient within wild dens.

Keywords

Thermal Treatment Control Treatment Experimental Analysis Thermal Gradient Experimental Manipulation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Aleksiuk M (1970) The effects of in vivo light and temperature acclimation on in vitro responses of heart rate to temperature in a cold-climate reptile, Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis. Canadian Journal of Zoology 48:1155–1161Google Scholar
  2. Sexton OJ, Hunt SR (1980) Temperature relationships and movements of snakes (Elaphe obsoleta, Coluber constrictor) in a cave hibernaculum. Herpetologica 36:20–26Google Scholar
  3. Viitanen P (1967) Hibernation and seasonal movements of the viper, Viper berus berus (L.) in southern Finland. Ann Zool Fennici 4:472–546Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Owen J. Sexton
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ken R. Marion
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of BiologyWashington UniversitySt. LouisUSA
  2. 2.University of Michigan Biological StationPellstonUSA
  3. 3.Department of BiologyUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamBirminghamUSA

Personalised recommendations