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Die Messung der regionalen Hirndurchblutung mittels intraarterieller Xenon-133-Injektion beim Menschen

  • R. Pálvölgyi
Article

Zusammenfassung

Es wurde ein zusammenfassender Überblick über die Theorie und die praktische Ausführung der intraarteriellen Xenon-133-Clearance-Methode zur Messung der Hirndurchblutung gegeben. Der Auswaschvorgang des in die A. carotis interna injizierten Xenons wird extrakraniell verfolgt. Auf Grund der gewonnenen linearen Clearance-Kurve wird die Hirndurchblutung in ml/100 g/min berechnet. Durch Analyse der logarithmischen Kurve kann in geeigneten Fällen das relative Gewicht der grauen und weißen Substanz und die Verteilung der Durch-blutung in beiden bestimmt werden. Bei pathologischen Veränderungen der Durchströmung ergibt die Analyse des Anfangsteils der Kurven die aufschlußreichsten Informationen über regionale Durchblutungsstörungen. Mittels verschiedener funktioneller Tests gelingt es, auch physiologische fokale Durchblutungsveränderungen eingehend zu studieren.

Schlüsselwörter

Regionale Hirndurchblutung Xenon-133 Clearance-Methode Mensch 

Measurement of regional cerebral blood in man by intraarterial Xenon-133-injection

Summary

A survey is given of the theory and practical execution of the intracranial Xenon clearance method for measuring the regional cerebral blood flow in man. The outwash of Xenon-133, injected via the internal carotid artery, is followed extracranially by multiple detectors. The CBF in ml/100 g/min is calculated on the base of the height and area of the clearance curve. With certain reservations, the relative weights of the grey and white matter can be estimated and thus the blood flow of these two components assessed. In pathological cases significant information can be obtained from the initial part of the clearance curves. The usefulness of various functional tests, using induced changes in blood pressure and in arterial pCO2 tension, the study of localized changes of cerebral blood flow is stressed.

Key-Words

Regional cerebral blood flow Intraarterial Xenon-133 Clearance method Man 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1968

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Pálvölgyi
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Radiologische Klinik der Universität BudapestUngran
  2. 2.Physiologische Abteilung des Bispebjerg Hospitals KopenhagenDänemark

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