Molecular and General Genetics MGG

, Volume 216, Issue 2–3, pp 224–229 | Cite as

Cloning of histidine genes of Azospirillum brasilense: Organization of the ABFH gene cluster and nucleotide sequence of the hisB gene

  • Renato Fani
  • Marco Bazzicalupo
  • Giuseppe Damiani
  • Alessandro Bianchi
  • Concetta Schipani
  • Vittorio Sgaramella
  • Mario Polsinelli
Article

Summary

A cluster of four Azospirillum brasilense histidine biosynthetic genes, hisA, hisB, hisF and hisH, was identified on a 4.5 kb DNA fragment and its organization studied by complementation analysis of Escherichia coli mutations and nucleotide sequence. The nucleotide sequence of a 1.3 kb fragment that complemented the E. coli hisB mutation was determined and an ORF of 624 nucleotides which can code for a protein of 207 amino acids was identified. A significant base sequence homology with the carboxyterminal moiety of the E. coli hisB gene (0.53) and the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HIS3 gene (0.44), coding for an imidazole glycerolphosphate dehydratase activity was found. The amino acid sequence and composition, the hydropathic profile and the predicted secondary structures of the yeast, E. coli and A. brasilense proteins were compared. The significance of the data presented is discussed.

Key words

Azospirillum Histidine cluster IGP dehydratase Nucleotide sequence 

Abbreviations

IGP

imidazole glycerolphosphate

HP

histidinolphosphate

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Renato Fani
    • 1
  • Marco Bazzicalupo
    • 1
  • Giuseppe Damiani
    • 2
    • 3
  • Alessandro Bianchi
    • 2
  • Concetta Schipani
    • 1
  • Vittorio Sgaramella
    • 2
  • Mario Polsinelli
    • 1
  1. 1.Dipartimento di Biologia Animale e GeneticaUniversità di FirenzeFirenzeItaly
  2. 2.Dipartimento di Genetica e MicrobiologiaUniversità di PaviaPaviaItaly
  3. 3.I.A.B.B.A.M.-CNRPonticelli, NapoliItaly

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