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The fine structure of the thymus of the fetal and neonatal monkey (Macaca mulatta)

  • W. L. ChapmanJr.
  • J. R. Allen
Article

Summary

The morphologic features of the fetal and neonatal thymus were investigated by light and electron microscopy to determine developmental changes. Primitive epithelial cells differentiate into reticular epithelial cells, medullary epithelial cells, elongated epithelial cells, Hassall's corpuscles and cysts. Thymocytes first appear at 50 days fetal age and the number of thymocytes is amplified from 75–150 days fetal age. Minor differences between the fetal thymus of the monkey and that of other species were observed. Possible functions for the various cellular components of the fetal monkey thymus are discussed.

Key-Words

Thymus Fine structure Fetus Primates Macaca mulatta 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. L. ChapmanJr.
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. R. Allen
    • 1
  1. 1.Wisconsin Regional Primate Research Center and Department of PathologyUniversity of WisconsinMadison
  2. 2.Department of Pathology and Parasitology College of Veterinary MedicineUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA

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