Molecular and General Genetics MGG

, Volume 203, Issue 2, pp 230–236

Selective allele loss and interference between cauliflower mosaic virus DNAs

  • Ulrich Melcher
  • In Seong Choe
  • Genevieve Lebeurier
  • Ken Richards
  • Richard C. Essenberg
Article

Summary

Some cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) alleles are selectively lost during growth of the virus in mixedly infected turnip plants. Viral DNA from plants co-inoculated with DNA of the cabbage S isolate and infectious cabbage S DNA with an extra EcoRI restriciion site lacked the extra site. The EcoRI allele was also lost in most plants co-inoculated with a non-infectious mutant of cabbage S DNA while little selective allele loss was observed with two other non-infectious mutant DNAs. Plants co-inoculated with DNAs of closely-related isolates (CM4-184 and W) contained both parental viral DNAs and some DNAs with characteristics of both parents. Interference, scored as a reduced frequency of infection or a delay in symptom appearance relative to plants inoculated with wild-type DNA, occurred when plants were inoculated with wild-type and mutant DNAs covalently attached to one another in partial dimer plasmid DNAs. Similarities in the conditions leading to selective allele loss and those leading to interference suggest that both may have been due to active gene conversion between CaMV DNA molecules.

Key words

Caulimoviruses Gene conversion Interference Recombination Turnip 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ulrich Melcher
    • 1
  • In Seong Choe
    • 1
  • Genevieve Lebeurier
    • 2
  • Ken Richards
    • 2
  • Richard C. Essenberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryOklahoma State UniversityStillwaterUSA
  2. 2.Laboratory of Virology, IBMCCNRSStrasbourgFrance
  3. 3.Division of Allergy and ImmunologyUniversity of Tennessee Medical SchoolMemphisUSA

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