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Chromosoma

, Volume 47, Issue 2, pp 157–166 | Cite as

Effects of ethidium bromide on mitosis and chromosomes: a possible material basis for chromosome stickiness

  • Manley McGill
  • Sen Pathak
  • T. C. Hsu
Article

Abstract

When two types of mammalian cells were treated with ethidium bromide for several hours, the mitotic figures showed no chromatid breaks or exchanges but a high incidence of sticky chromosomes. Electron microscopic examinations revealed that many chromosomes are connected by submicroscopic chromatin strands of various widths. Chromosome stickiness, therefore, is interpreted as entanglement of chromatin fibers between unrelated chromosomes, probably caused by abnormal condensation behaviors prior to mitosis. Presumably, chromatin breaks would occur when sticky chromosomes separate during anaphase. Such microscopically undetectable breaks expressed as various kinds of chromosomal aberrations in the next mitosis when the damaged cells were permitted to recover in the absence of ethidium bromide.

Keywords

Bromide Mammalian Cell Ethidium Developmental Biology Ethidium Bromide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Manley McGill
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sen Pathak
    • 1
    • 2
  • T. C. Hsu
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.The Department of BiologyThe University of Texas System Cancer Center M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor InstituteHouston
  2. 2.The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical SciencesHouston

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