Chromosoma

, Volume 89, Issue 5, pp 343–351

Relationships within the melanogaster species subgroup of the genus Drosophila (Sophophora)

IV. The chromosomes of two new species
  • F. Lemeunier
  • M. Ashburner
Article

Abstract

The polytene chromosomes of two new species of Drosophila, D. sechellia and D. orena, both members of the melanogaster species subgroup, are described. The chromosomes of D. sechellia, a species endemic to certain islands in the Seychelles, are homosequential with those of D. simulans and D. mauritiana. The chromosomes of D. orena, a species from the mountains of west Africa, are very similar to those of D. erecta. We discuss the interrelationships of the eight known species of the melanogaster species subgroup, based upon an analysis of their chromosome banding patterns.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Ashburner M (1980) Some aspects of the structure and function of the polytene chromosomes of the Diptera. In: Blackman RL, Hewitt GM, Ashburner M (eds) Insect cytogenetics, Symp R Entom Soc, London, vol 10. Blackwell, Oxford, pp 65–84Google Scholar
  2. Barnes SR, Webb DA, Dover G (1978) The distribution of satellite and main band DNA components in the melanogaster species subgroup of Drosophila. Chromosoma 67:341–363Google Scholar
  3. Bock IR (1980) Current status of the Drosophila melanogaster species group. (Diptera). Syst Ent 5:341–356Google Scholar
  4. Bock IR, Wheeler M (1972) The Drosophila melanogaster species group. Univ Texas Publ 7213:1–102Google Scholar
  5. Burkill LH (1935) A dictionary of economic products of the Malay peninsula. Crown agents for the colonies. London, 2 vols. p 244 AGoogle Scholar
  6. Carton Y, Kitano H (1981) Evolutionary relationships to parasitism by seven species of the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup. Biol J Linn Soc 16:227–241Google Scholar
  7. Caspersson T, Farber S, Foley GE, Kudynowski J, Modest EJ, Simonsson E, Wagh V, Zech L (1968) Chemical differentiation along metaphase chromosomes. Exp Cell Res 49:219–222Google Scholar
  8. Cohet Y, Vouibibio J, David J (1980) Thermal tolerance and geographic distribution: A comparison of cosmopolitan and tropical endemic Drosophila species. J Thermal Biol 5:69–74Google Scholar
  9. Cowling DE, Burnet B (1981) Courtship songs and genetic control of their acoustic characteristics in sibling pecies of the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup. Anim Behav 29:924–935Google Scholar
  10. Cseko YMT, Dower NA, Minoo P, Lowenstein L, Smith GR, Stone J, Sederoff R (1979) Evolution of polypyrimidines in Drosophila. Genetics 92:459–484Google Scholar
  11. David J, Lemeunier F, Tsacas L, Bocquet C (1974) Hybridation d'une nouvelle espece de Drosophila avec D. melanogaster et D. simulans. Ann Genet 17:235–241Google Scholar
  12. David J, Bocquet C, Lemeunier F, Tsacas L (1976) Persistence of the male sterility in strains issued from hybrids between two sibling species, Drosophila simulans and D. mauritiana. J Genet 62:93–100Google Scholar
  13. Dover GA (1980) The evolution of sequences common to closely related insect genomes. In: Blackman R, Hewitt GM, Ashburner M (eds) Insect cytogenetics, Symp R Entom Soc, London, vol 10, Blackwell, Oxford, p 13–15Google Scholar
  14. Eisses KT, van Dijk H, van Delden W (1979) Genetic differentiation within the melanogaster species group of the genus Drosophila (Sophophora). Evolution 33:1063–1068Google Scholar
  15. Farris JJ (1978) Inferring phylogenetic trees from chromosome inversion data. Syst Zool 27:275–284Google Scholar
  16. Gonzalez AM, Cabrera VM, Gullon A (1982) Genetic distance in the sibling species Drosophila melanogaster, Drosophila simulans and Drosophila mauritiana. Evolution 36:513–522Google Scholar
  17. Green CA (1982) Cladistic analysis of mosquito chromosome data (Anopheles (Cellia) Myzomyia). J Hered 73:2–11Google Scholar
  18. Guppy HB (1890) The dispersal of plants as illustrated by the flora of the Keeling or Cocos Islands. J Trans Victoria Inst 24:267–306Google Scholar
  19. Guppy HB (1906) Observations of a naturalist in the Pacific between 1896 and 1899. Volume II. Plant dispersal. MacMillan and Co, London, p 627Google Scholar
  20. Halfer C (1981) Interstrain heterochromatin polymorphisms in Drosophila melanogaster. Chromosoma 84:195–206Google Scholar
  21. Hamilton AC (1982) Environmental history of east Africa. Academic Press, London, New York, p 328Google Scholar
  22. Hennig W (1966) Phylogenetic systematics. Univ Illinois Press, Urbana, Chicago, London, p 263Google Scholar
  23. Jouan H (1865) Recherches sur l'origine et la provenance de certains vegetaux phanerograms observes dans les iles du GrandOcean. Mem Soc Imp Sci Nat 11:81–178Google Scholar
  24. Lefevre G (1976) A photographic representation and interpretation of the polytene chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster salivary glands. In: Ashburner M, Novitski E (eds) The genetics and biology of Drosophila, vol 1a. Academic Press, London, New York, pp 31–66Google Scholar
  25. Lemeunier F, Ashburner M (1976) Relationships within the melanogaster species subgroup of the genus Drosophila (Sophophora). II. Phylogenetic relationships between six species based upon polytene chromosome banding sequences. Proc R Soc B 193:275–294Google Scholar
  26. Lemeunier F, Dutrillaux B, Ashburner M (1978) Relationships within the melanogaster species subgroup of the genus Drosophila (Sophophora). III. The mitotic chromosomes and quinacrine fluorescent patterns of the polytene chromosomes. Chromosoma 69:349–361Google Scholar
  27. Lemeunier F, Tsacas L, David J, Ashburner M (In preparation) The melanogaster species group. In: Ashburner M, Carson HL, Thompson JN (eds) The genetics and biology of Drosophila. Academic Press, London, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  28. Livingstone DA (1975) Late Quarternary climatic changes in Africa. Annu Rev Ecol Syst 6:249–280Google Scholar
  29. Rocha Pité MT, Tsacas L (1979) Catalogue of the European species of the genus Drosophila. Bolm Soc Port Cienc Nat 19:37–47Google Scholar
  30. Sauer JD (1967) Plants and man on the Seychelles coast. Univ Wisconsin Press, Madison, Milwaukee, London, p 132Google Scholar
  31. Stanley SM, Parsons PA, Spence GE, Weber L (1980) Resistance of species of the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup to environmental extremes. Aust J Zool 28:413–421Google Scholar
  32. Strachan T, Coen E, Webb D, Dover GA (1982) Modes and rates of change of complex DNA families of Drosophila. J Mol Biol 158:37–54Google Scholar
  33. Sumner AT (1972) A simple technique for demonstrating centromeric heterochromatin. Exp Cell Res 75:304–306Google Scholar
  34. Throckmorton L (1965) Similarity versus relationship in Drosophila. Syst Zool 14:221–236Google Scholar
  35. Throckmorton L (1977) Drosophila systematics and biochemical evolution. Ann Rev Ecol Syst 8:235–254Google Scholar
  36. Tsacas L (1974) Drosophila matilei, nouvelle espece de l'ouest Cameroun, du groupe melanogaster, et redescription de D. microlabis Seguy. Bull Soc Ent Fr 79:146–151Google Scholar
  37. Tsacas L (1979) Contribution des donnees Africaines a la comprehension de la biogeographie et de l'evolution du sous-genre Drosophila (Sophophora) Sturtevant, (Diptera, Drosophilidae). CR Soc Biogeog 48:29–51Google Scholar
  38. Tsacas L, Bachli G (1981) Drosophila sechellia n.sp., huitieme espece du sous-groupe melanogaster des Iles Sechelles [Diptera, Drosophilidae]. Rev Fr Ent 3:146–150Google Scholar
  39. Tsacas L, David J (1978) Une septieme espece appartenant au sous-groupe Drosophila melanogaster Meigen, Drosophila orena spec nov du Cameroun (Diptera, Drosophilidae). Beitr Ent 28:179–182Google Scholar
  40. Tsacas L, Lachaise D (1974) Quatre nouvelles espece de la Cote d'Ivoire du genre Drosophila, groupe melanogaster, et discussion de l'origine du sous-groupe melanogaster (Diptera, Drosophilidae). Ann Univ d'Abidjan, Series E, Ecol 7:193–211Google Scholar
  41. Tsacas L, Lachaise D, David J (1981) Composition and biogeography of the Afrotropical drosophilid fauna. In: Ashburner M, Carson HL, Thompson JN (eds) The genetics and biology of Drosophila, vol 3a. Academic Press, London, New York, p 197–259Google Scholar
  42. Wasserman M (1982) Evolution of the repleta group. In: Ashburner M, Thompson JN, Carson HL (eds) The genetics and biology of Drosophila, vol. 3b. Academic Press, London, New York, p 61–139Google Scholar
  43. Watanabe T (1979) A gene that rescues the lethal hybrids between Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans. Jpn J Genet 54:325–331Google Scholar
  44. Watanabe TK, Lee WH, Inoue Y, Kawanishi M (1977) Genetic variation of the hybrid crossability between Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans. Jpn J Genet 52:1–8Google Scholar
  45. Yamaguchi O, Mukai T (1974) Variation of spontaneous occurrence rates of chromosomal aberrations in the second chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. Genetics 78:1202–1221Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Lemeunier
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Ashburner
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratoire de Biologie et Genetique EvolutivesC.N.R.S.Gif-sur-YvetteFrance
  2. 2.Department of GeneticsUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeEngland

Personalised recommendations