Molecular and General Genetics MGG

, Volume 202, Issue 1, pp 58–61

Regulation of exoprotein gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus by agr

  • P. Recsei
  • B. Kreiswirth
  • M. O'Reilly
  • P. Schlievert
  • A. Gruss
  • R. P. Novick
Article

Summary

Insertion of the erythromycin-resistance transposon Tn551 into the Staphylococcus aureus chromosome at a site which maps between the purB and ilv loci has a pleiotrophic effect on the production of a number of extracellular proteins. Production of alpha, beta and delta hemolysin, toxic shock syndrome toxin (TSST-1) and staphylokinase was depressed about fifty-fold while protein A production was elevated twenty-fold. Hybridization analysis showed that the defect in expression of TSST-1 and alpha hemolysin was at the transcriptional level. Inability of the mutant strain to express either a cloned TSST-1 gene or the chromosomal gene indicates that the transposon has inactivated a trans-active positive control element. This element has been designated agr for accessory gene regulator.

Key words

Gene regulation Pathogenicity Exoproteins Pletotropism S. aureus 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Recsei
    • 1
  • B. Kreiswirth
    • 1
  • M. O'Reilly
    • 1
  • P. Schlievert
    • 2
  • A. Gruss
    • 1
  • R. P. Novick
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Plasmid BiologyThe Public Health Research Institute of the City of New York, Inc.New York
  2. 2.Department of MicrobiologyUniversity of Minnesota Medical SchoolMinneapolisUSA
  3. 3.Department of Microbiology, Moyne InstituteTrinity CollegeDublin 2Ireland

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