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Chromosoma

, Volume 92, Issue 2, pp 116–123 | Cite as

A preliminary genetic analysis of TE146, a very large transposing element of Drosophila melanogaster

  • D. Gubb
  • J. Roote
  • G. Harrington
  • S. McGill
  • B. Durrant
  • M. Shelton
  • M. Ashburner
Article

Abstract

TE146 is a transposing element (TE) consisting of six polytene chromosome bands that has inserted into the no-ocelli (noc 2∶50) locus. This member of Ising's TE family carries two copies of the white and roughest loci. TE146 is lost from noc with a spontaneous frequency of approximately 1 in 22000 chromosomes. All spontaneous losses are accompanied by the reversion of the noc mutation associated with the TE. The TE is associated with fold-back (FB) sequences. The losses of TE146 retain fold-back homology at noc. Of 26 γ-ray-induced losses of TE146, 16 are gross deletions, removing loci neighboring noc and ten are not. The non-deleted γ-ray-induced losses are either noc and rst+ or noc+ and rst. The white+ genes of TE146 are dosage compensated since w/Y; TE146/+ and w/w; TE146/+ flies are sexually dimorphic for eye color. These w+ genes are also suppressed by zeste since z w; TE146/+ flies have zeste-colored eyes.

Keywords

Genetic Analysis Developmental Biology Transpose Element Polytene Chromosome Chromosome Band 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Gubb
    • 1
  • J. Roote
    • 1
  • G. Harrington
    • 1
  • S. McGill
    • 1
  • B. Durrant
    • 1
  • M. Shelton
    • 1
  • M. Ashburner
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of GeneticsUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeEngland

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