World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 10, Issue 6, pp 653–656

Biodegradation of slop oil from a petrochemical industry and bioreclamation of slop oil contaminated soil

  • H. Dave
  • C. Ramakrishna
  • B. D. Bhatt
  • J. D. Desai
Research

Abstract

Slop oil, i.e. waste oil from a petrochemical complex, contains at least 240 hydrocarbon components, of which 54% are from C5 to C11 and the rest from C12 to C23. Of 22 isolated bacterial cultures that were able to degrade slop oil, seven could each degrade about 40% of the slop oil, and a mixture of all seven could degrade ≤50% in liquid medium. Bioaugmentation of soil contaminated with slop oil with the mixed bacterial culture gave up to 70% degradation of slop oil after 30 days. This compares with 40% degradation without bioaugmentation. Bioaugmentation led to a significant increase in counts of bacteria able to degrade slop oil. Wheat sown on bioaugmented soil germinated and grew better than on non-augmented soil and led to increased degradation of slop oil (up to 80%). This indicates the potential of mixed culture for bioremediation.

Key words

Biodegradation bioreclamation petrochemical waste oil phytotoxicity soil contamination 

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Copyright information

© Rapid Communications of Oxford Ltd 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Dave
    • 1
  • C. Ramakrishna
    • 1
  • B. D. Bhatt
    • 1
  • J. D. Desai
    • 1
  1. 1.Research CentreIndian Petrochemicals Corporation Limited, VadodaraGujaratIndia

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