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Fresenius' Journal of Analytical Chemistry

, Volume 352, Issue 1–2, pp 49–52 | Cite as

Analytical strategy for the chemical characterization of biological reference materials

  • Milan Ihnat
Global Needs For RM

Abstract

The analytical strategy for the elemental chemical characterization of biological reference materials followed during a recently completed Reference Material development endeavour is discussed. Characterization, the assignment of reliable values to total elemental concentrations of a wide range of elements, poses the most difficult challenge in the scheme of reference material (RM) production. A review is presented of the many factors considered that significantly impinged on the conduct and outcome of the complex analytical characterization exercise. Major considerations were: (1) analytical elemental characterization philosophy, (2) analyte selection, (3) selection of analytical methodologies, (4) statistical protocols, (5) in-house characterization, (6) assessment of material homogeneity (7) cooperative interlaboratory characterization campaign, (8) data evaluation and (9) calculation of concentration values and associated uncertainties.

Keywords

Reference Material Data Evaluation Elemental Concentration Analytical Strategy Material Homogeneity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Milan Ihnat
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Land and Biological Resources Research, Research Branch, Agriculture and Agri-Food CanadaOttawaCanada

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