Anatomy and Embryology

, Volume 178, Issue 3, pp 253–257 | Cite as

The effect of temperature on myogenesis in embryonic development of the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.)

  • N. C. Stickland
  • R. N. White
  • P. E. Mescall
  • A. R. Crook
  • J. E. Thorpe
Article

Summary

From fertilisation to hatching one group of salmon embryos was reared at ambient temperatures (fluctuating around 1.6° C) and another at 10° C. At Gorodilov stages 28, 30 and 33 transverse sections of whole embryos were obtained for light and electron microscopy. Total cross-sectional areas, fibre numbers, fibre diameters and myofibrillar areas of the white muscle of m. lateralis were measured. At hatching (stage 33, which occurred much earlier at the higher temperature), the higher temperature embryos had significantly larger (P< 0.01) but fewer (P< 0.05) muscle fibres. These larger fibres contained significantly more myofibrillar material (P< 0.05) than the smaller fibres of the lower temperature embryos. Lesser differences were found at pre-hatching stages. Higher temperatures caused myofibre hypertrophy to increase at a greater rate than hyperplasia. Hence, the cellularity of the tissue produced under the different temperature regimes was quite different.

Key words

Salmon Myogenesis Temperature 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Balon EK (1980) Charrs: Salmonid fish of the genus Salvelinus. Junk Publishers, The HagueGoogle Scholar
  2. Fluchter H, Rosenthal P (1965) Beobachtungen über das Vorkomen und Leichen des blauen Wittlings (Micromesistius poutassou Risso) in der deutschen Bucht. Helgol Wiss Meeresunders 12:149–155Google Scholar
  3. Gorodilov Yu N (1983) Stadii embryonalnogo razvitiya atlanticheskogo lososya Salmo salar L. II. Opisaniye i khronologia. Sb Nauchn Tr GosNIORKh 200:107–126 Transl Thorpe JE, Scott Fish Res Transl 19:1–34Google Scholar
  4. Hayes FR, Pelluet D, Gorham E (1953) Some effects of temperature on the embryonic development of the salmon (Salmo salar). Can J Zool 31:42–51Google Scholar
  5. Higgins PJ (1985) Metabolic differences between Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) parr and smolts. Aquaculture 45:33–53Google Scholar
  6. Krogh A (1914) On the influence of the temperature on the rate of embryonic development. Allg Physiol 16:163–177Google Scholar
  7. Kinne O, Kinne EM (1962) Rates of development in embryos of a cyprinodont fish exposed to different temperature-salinity-oxygen combinations. Can J Zool 40:231–253Google Scholar
  8. Stickland NC (1981) Muscle development in the human fetus as exemplified by m. sartorius: a quantitative study. J Anat 132:557–579Google Scholar
  9. Stickland NC (1983) Growth and development of muscle fibres in the rainbow trout (Salmo gairnneri). J Anat 137:323–333Google Scholar
  10. Villarreal CA (1983) The role of light and endocrine factors in the development of bimodality of growth in the juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.). PhD Thesis, University of Stirling, p 381Google Scholar
  11. Waterman RE (1969) Development of the lateral musculature in the teleost, Brachydanio rerio: a fine structural study. Am J Anat 125:457–492Google Scholar
  12. Weatherley AH, Gill HS (1987) The biology of fish growth. Academic Press, London, p 443Google Scholar
  13. Weatherley AH, Gill HS, Rogers SC (1979) Growth dynamics of muscle fibres, dry weight and condition in relation to somatic growth rate in yearling rainbow trout (Salmo gaidneri). Can J Zool 57:2385–2392Google Scholar
  14. Weatherley AH, Gill HS, Rogers SC (1980) Growth dynamics of mosaic muscle fibres in fingerling rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) in relation to somatic growth rate. Can J Zool 58:1535–1541Google Scholar
  15. Wigmore PMC, Stickland NC (1983) Muscle development in large and small pig fetuses. J Anat 137:235–245Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. C. Stickland
    • 1
  • R. N. White
    • 1
  • P. E. Mescall
    • 1
  • A. R. Crook
    • 1
  • J. E. Thorpe
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of AnatomyThe Royal Veterinary CollegeLondonUnited Kingdom
  2. 2.Freshwater Fisheries LaboratoryPitlochryUnited Kingdom

Personalised recommendations