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Surgical Endoscopy

, Volume 7, Issue 5, pp 400–403 | Cite as

Laparoscopic cholecystectomy for patients who have had previous abdominal surgery

  • K. Miller
  • N. Hölbling
  • J. Hutter
  • W. Junger
  • E. Moritz
  • T. Speil
Original Articles

Summary

This paper reports 121 laparoscopic cholecystectomies (LC) in patients who had had previous abdominal surgery between June 1990 and August 1992. There were 93 cases with lower abdominal scar (LS) and 28 with upper or umbilicus midline scar (US). For insertion of the laparoscope in the scarred abdomen we use the conventional laparoscopic approach (CLA), the peritoneum perforation under vision approach (PP), and the open laparoscopic approach (OLA). One hundred twenty scarred abdomens were completed successfully. Conversion to an open procedure was required in one case with previous LS, because of injury of the jejunum. One postoperative intraabdominal hematoma was noted and treated with percutaneous catheter drainage. No reoperation was required and no further complications were noted. Patients who had a previous laparotomy had no substantially longer operative time or postoperative hospital stay. Revealing a total complication rate of 1.6%, this study shows that previous abdominal surgery should no longer be considered a contraindication to LC.

Key words

Laparoscopy Scarred abdomen Previous laparotomy 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Miller
    • 1
  • N. Hölbling
    • 1
  • J. Hutter
    • 1
  • W. Junger
    • 1
  • E. Moritz
    • 1
  • T. Speil
    • 1
  1. 1.Second Department of SurgeryGeneral Hospital SalzburgSalzburgAustria

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