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Current Genetics

, Volume 26, Issue 3, pp 208–216 | Cite as

Molecular analysis of a leu2 mutant of Candida maltosa demonstrates the presence of multiple alleles

  • Dietmar Becher
  • Steffen Schulze
  • Anette Kasüske
  • Heiko Schulze
  • Ida A. Samsonova
  • Stephen G. Oliver
Original Articles

Abstract

Three different alleles of the β-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase gene were cloned and sequenced from a leucine auxotrophic mutant, G587, of Candida maltosa. The cloning of functionally-intact wild-type genes from this mutant strain suggests the presence of silent gene copies. An interallelic-divergence comparison has provided evidence for new regulatory mechanisms. Sequence data and karyotype analysis argue for a highly-aneuploid genome of C. maltosa. An interpretation for the spontaneous auxotrophy-prototrophy-auxotrophy sequence of mutations in C. maltosa is suggested.

Key words

β-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase Allelic variation Genome organisation Candida maltosa Silent genes 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dietmar Becher
    • 1
  • Steffen Schulze
    • 1
  • Anette Kasüske
    • 1
  • Heiko Schulze
    • 1
  • Ida A. Samsonova
    • 1
  • Stephen G. Oliver
    • 2
  1. 1.Fachrichtung Biologie, Institut für Genetik und BiochemieErnst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität GreifswaldGreifswaldGermany
  2. 2.Department of Biochemistry and Applied Molecular BiologyUMISTManchesterUK

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