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Psychological Research

, Volume 49, Issue 1, pp 7–15 | Cite as

The combination of explicit and implicit learning processes in task control

  • Dianne C. Berry
  • Donald E. Broadbent
Article

Summary

Two experiments look at the combination of explicit and implicit learning processes on a single task. Subjects are required to control the rate of sugar output in a small sugar production factory while maintaining cordial relations with the union. Experiment 1 investigates whether subjects can learn to control this task, which relies on their knowing about both salient and nonsalient relationships. It looks at how performance on the task relates to explicit verbalisable knowledge (as assessed by written questionnaire). Experiment 2 considers alternative ways of tapping the more implicit aspects of subjects' knowledge.

Keywords

Learning Process Production Factory Sugar Output Task Control Implicit Learning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Barr, A., & Feigenbaum, E. A. (1982). The handbook of artificial intelligence. London: Pitman Books.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dianne C. Berry
    • 1
  • Donald E. Broadbent
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Experimental PsychologyUniversity of OxfordOxfordUK

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