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Coral Reefs

, Volume 3, Issue 1, pp 1–11 | Cite as

Model of a coral reef ecosystem

I. The ECOPATH model and its application to French Frigate Shoals
  • Jeffrey J. Polovina
Article

Abstract

A simple model termed ECOPATH is presented which estimates mean annual biomass, production, and consumption for components of an ecosystem. To use the model, the ecosystem must be partitioned into groups of similar species and provide for these species groups, estimates of production to biomass, diet, and food consumption. The ECOPATH model is applied to an ecosystem at French Frigate Shoals in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Extensive field work provides both estimates of the input parameters as well as estimates of mean annual biomass and production. Biomass and production estimates for some of the species groups modeled are used to validate the estimates generated by the model.

Keywords

Biomass Simple Model Input Parameter Coral Reef Food Consumption 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeffrey J. Polovina
    • 1
  1. 1.Southwest Fisheries Center Honolulu LaboratoryNational Marine Fisheries Service, NOAAHonoluluUSA

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