Social Indicators Research

, Volume 27, Issue 4, pp 327–344

The abortion decision: A qualitative choice approach

  • Lonnie K. Stevans
  • Charles A. Register
  • David N. Sessions
Article

Abstract

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey, Youth Cohort, logistic regression models are estimated to show the impact of various sociodemographic and economic factors on the abortion decision for 1867 pregnancies occurring between 1983 and 1985 in the data set. The results suggest a profile of a woman choosing the abortion decision as being White, unmarried, residing in the Northeast or West, relatively well-educated, and either in-school or working. Additionally, the female is likely to have a relatively high person income and, if present, a relatively low spousal income. Being Baptist or Catholic appears to have no significant influence on the abortion decision, and the same is true for Baptists and Catholics who are religious (attend church more than two times per month). The degree of religiosity is a predictor of abortion outcome, irrespective of religious affiliation. Finally, it is found that for low income women, access to Medicaid funding does significantly increase the probability of choosing the abortion option.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lonnie K. Stevans
    • 1
    • 2
  • Charles A. Register
    • 1
    • 2
  • David N. Sessions
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Dept. of QM/BCISHofstra UniversityHempsteadUSA
  2. 2.Dept of Economics/FinanceUniversity of BaltimoreBaltimoreUSA

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