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Child's Nervous System

, Volume 10, Issue 7, pp 421–425 | Cite as

Familial occurrence of moyamoya disease

Magnetic resonance angiography as a screening test for high-risk subjects
  • Kiyohiro Houkin
  • Naruhiko Tanaka
  • Akihiro Takahashi
  • Hiroyasu Kamiyama
  • Hiroshi Abe
  • Naofumi Kajii
Original Paper

Abstract

The authors report four cases of familial occurrence of moyamoya disease. Although the pathogenesis of moyamoya disease is not clear, there is extensive evidence that this disease has a tendency to show multifactorial inheritance. Therefore, a screening test for those at high risk, i.e., who have a moyamoya patient among their blood relatives, is clinically important. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) successfully revealed abnormal findings specific to moyamoya disease in members of the four probands families. MRA is a powerful and noninvasive way of detecting individuals at high risk of developing moymoya disease.

Key words

Moyamoya disease Magnetic resonance angiography Familial occurrence 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kiyohiro Houkin
    • 1
  • Naruhiko Tanaka
    • 1
  • Akihiro Takahashi
    • 1
  • Hiroyasu Kamiyama
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Abe
    • 1
  • Naofumi Kajii
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryHokkaido University School of MedicineSapporoJapan
  2. 2.Department of PediatricsHokkaido University School of MedicineSapporoJapan

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