Cell and Tissue Research

, Volume 277, Issue 1, pp 19–26 | Cite as

Odontoclastic resorption of the superficial nonmineralized layer of predentine in the shedding of human deciduous teeth

  • Noriyuki Sahara
  • Norimasa Okafuji
  • Azusa Toyoki
  • Yuji Ashizawa
  • Toshio Deguchi
  • Kazuo Suzuki
Article

Abstract

Resorption by odontoclasts of a superficial nonmineralized layer of predentine that occurs in prior to the shedding of human deciduous teeth was studied by light and electron microscopy. As resorption of the tooth roots neared completion, multinucleate cells appeared on the predentine surface of the coronal dentine between the degenerated odontoblasts, excavated characteristic resorption lacunae in the nonmineralized predentine. These multinucleate cells had the same ultrastructural characteristics as odontoclasts and histochemical demonstration of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity in the multinucleate cells revealed intense staining in numerous small granules identified as lysosomes. Occasionally, the multinucleate cells simultaneously resorbed both nonmineralized and calcospherite-mineralized matrix in the predentine. The study demonstrates that multinucleate odontoclasts can resorb nonmineralized predentine matrix in vivo, probably in the same way as they resorb demineralized organic matrix in the resorption zone underlying their ruffled border.

Key words

Odontoclasts Resorption Predentine Ultrastructure Histochemistry TR-ACPase (tartrateresistant acid phosphatase) Deciduous teeth Shedding Human 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Andreasen JO, Andreasen FM (1992) Root resorption following traumatic dental injuries. Proc Finn Dent Soc 88:95–114Google Scholar
  2. Bishop MA (1985) Evidence for tight junctions between odontoblasts in the rat incisor. Cell Tissue Res 239:137–140Google Scholar
  3. Boyde A, Hobdell MH (1969) Scanning electron microscopy of lamellar bone. Z Zellforsch 93:213–231Google Scholar
  4. Burstone MS (1965) Histochemical comparison of naphthol AS-phosphate for the demonstration of phosphatases. J Natl Cancer Inst 20:601–615Google Scholar
  5. Chambers TJ, Fuller K (1985) Bone cells predispose bone surfaces to resorption by exposure of mineral to osteoclastic contact. J Cell Sci 76:155–156Google Scholar
  6. Chambers TJ, Thomson BM, Fuller K (1984) Effect of substrate composition on bone resorption by rabbit osteoclasts. J Cell Sci 70:61–71Google Scholar
  7. Freilich LS (1971) Ultrastructure and acid phosphatase cytochemistry of odontoclasts: Effects of parathyroid extract. J Dent Res 50:1047–1055Google Scholar
  8. Furseth R (1968) The resorption processes of human deciduous teeth studied by light microscopy, microradiography and electron microscopy. Archs Oral Biol 13:417–431Google Scholar
  9. Hammarström LE, Lindskog S (1985) General morphological aspects of resorption of teeth and alveolar bone. Int Endodont J 18:93–108Google Scholar
  10. Hammarström LE, Hanker JS, Toverud SU (1971) Cellular differences in acid phosphatase isoenzymes in bone and teeth. Clin Orthop and Relat Res 78:151–167Google Scholar
  11. Jones SJ, Boyde A (1988) The resorption of dentin and cementum in vivo and in vitro. In: Davidovitch Z (ed) The biological mechanisms of tooth eruption and root resorption. EBSCO, Media, Birmingham, pp 335–354Google Scholar
  12. Jones SJ, Boyde A, Ali NN (1984) The resorption of biological and non-biological substrates by cultured avian and mammalian osteoclasts. Anat Embryol 170:247–256Google Scholar
  13. Krukowski M, Kahn AJ (1982) Inductive specificity of mineralized bone matrix in ectopic osteoclast differentiation. Calcif Tissue Int 34:474–479Google Scholar
  14. Matsuda E (1992) Ultrastructural and cytochemical study of the odontoclasts in physiologic root resorption of human deciduous teeth. J Electron Microsc 41:131–140Google Scholar
  15. Nilsen R, Magnusson BC (1981) Enzyme histochemical studies of acid phosphatase isoenzymes in induced heterotopic bone formation in guinea pigs. Scand J Dent Res 89:485–490Google Scholar
  16. Raisz LG (1976) Mechanisms of bone resorption. In: Handbook of physiology, section 7: endocrinology, vol 7, chapter 4. American Physiological Society, Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore, pp 117–136Google Scholar
  17. Reid SA (1986) Effect of mineral content of human bone on in vitro resorption. Anat Embryol 174:225–234Google Scholar
  18. Rodan GA, Martin TJ (1981) Role of osteoblasts in hormonal control of bone resorption — A hypothesis. Calcif Tissue Int 33:349–351Google Scholar
  19. Sahara N, Okafuji N, Toyoki A, Suzuki I, Deguchi T, Suzuki K (1992) Odontoclastic resorption at the pulpal surface of coronal dentin prior to the shedding of human deciduous teeth. Arch Histol Cytol 55:273–285Google Scholar
  20. Sasaki T, Ueno-Matsuda E (1992) Immunocytochemical localization of cathepsins B and G in odontoclasts of human deciduous teeth. J Dent Res 71:1881–1884Google Scholar
  21. Sasaki T, Motegi N, Suzuki H, Watanabe C, Tadokoro K, Yanagisawa T, Higashi S (1988) Dentin resorption mediated by odontoclasts in physiological root resorption of human deciduous teeth. Am J Anat 183:303–315Google Scholar
  22. Sasaki T, Shimizu T, Suzuki H, Watanabe C (1989) Cytodifferentiation and degeneration of odontoclasts in physiologic root resorption of kitten deciduous teeth. Acta Anat 135:330–340Google Scholar
  23. Ten Cate AA, Anderson RD (1986) An ultrastructural study of tooth resorption in the kitten. J Dent Res 65:1087–1093Google Scholar
  24. Vaes G (1988) Cellular biology and biochemical mechanism of bone resorption. A review of recent developments on the formation, activation, and mode of action of osteoclasts. Clin Orthop Relat Res 231:239–271Google Scholar
  25. Wedenberg C, Lindskog S (1985) Experimental internal resorption in monkey teeth. Dent Traumatol 1:221–227Google Scholar
  26. Wedenberg C, Zetterqvist L (1987) Internal resorption in human teeth — A histological, scanning electron microscopic, and enzyme histochemical study. J Endodon 13:255–259Google Scholar
  27. Yaeger JA, Kraucunas E (1969) Fine structure of the resorptive cells in the teeth of frog. Anat Rec 164:1–14Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Noriyuki Sahara
    • 1
  • Norimasa Okafuji
    • 2
  • Azusa Toyoki
    • 2
  • Yuji Ashizawa
    • 2
  • Toshio Deguchi
    • 2
  • Kazuo Suzuki
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Oral HistologyMatsumoto Dental CollegeShiojiriJapan
  2. 2.Department of OrthodonticsMatsumoto Dental CollegeShiojiriJapan

Personalised recommendations